Notorious RBG

December 17, 2017
By oliviq SILVER, Belle Chasse, Louisiana
oliviq SILVER, Belle Chasse, Louisiana
5 articles 0 photos 1 comment

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been a supreme court justice for over twenty-three years and has done so many amazing things before her induction in 1993. Ginsburg, a Brooklyn native, was raised by two immigrant parents who taught her the importance of being independent and having a good education. After losing her mother to ovarian cancer in high school, Ginsburg continued to work hard and graduated top of her class; She was later accepted into three ivy league colleges. She jumped over countless hurdles pushed in front of her simply because of her gender. Ginsburg continued to push through the race and crossed the finish line a better person because of those obstacles. Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s entire life exemplifies the heroic traits of true wisdom, undeniable strength in the face of adversity, and bravery during difficult situations.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg is just five feet tall but those meager 60 inches holds a brain that has enough wisdom to fill a room, get her into three ivy league schools, and write countless papers on gender equality. Ginsburg got her bachelor degree in government at Cornell University, continued her law education at Harvard University, and finished law school at Columbia University, graduating top of her class. After college Ginsburg clerked for U.S. District Judge Edmund L. Palmieri. Then became one of less than twenty female law professors in the nation after accepting a teaching position at Rutgers University Law School. Later she began teaching at Columbia University and became the first female tenured professor there. In the seventies Ginsburg played a major role in the American Civil Liberties Union’s Women’s Rights Project and brought many sex discrimination cases to court. Ruth Bader Ginsburg holds so much wisdom and it is seen in her many degrees, awards, and actions.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg is someone I immediately think of when the trait of strength is mentioned.  In 1999 Ginsburg was diagnosed with colon cancer and in 2009 she developed pancreatic cancer. She defeated cancer in both battles and is something close to a walking miracle. She met her husband, Martin Ginsburg, at Cornell University and shortly after their marriage they started a family. In her first year of attending Harvard University she was raising a one year old and tending to her husband, who had developed testicular cancer. She managed to keep up her grades, as well as, go to Martin’s classes and take notes for him so he would not fall behind. In her last year of college Ginsburg graduated valedictorian but did not have one job offer. A professor of hers had to beg for her resumée to even be looked at because she was a woman. She was told straight to her face that she was going to be paid less than her male co-workers because her husband had a stable income. This was a reoccurring theme in Ginsburg’s life. She later sued both Rutgers University and Columbia University for equal pay and won both cases. The word strength should be added on to her name; Ginsburg is a two time cancer survivor along with her husband, a mother of two who managed to maintain her career, and a woman who was told many times that she was ‘less than’.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg invented the word bravery. After the birth of her daughter Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of five hundred men to attend Harvard Law. The dean of Harvard at the time told her that she was taking a rightful man’s spot, although she was at the top of her class. She was seen as unimportant because law at the time was a male dominated profession. Ginsburg switched the scripts and wrote her own future, ignoring negative feedback and all the doors shut in her face. While teaching at Rutgers University she was forced to hide her second pregnancy for fear of losing her job. There were no laws protecting pregnant women in the workplace. Earning respect as a woman in her place at that time was extremely difficult, as seen in her past experiences, but being pregnant made it a thousand times more difficult. She had her son in the summer and went back to work a month later as if nothing happened. She later endorsed a law that protected pregnant women in the workplace, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978. Her actions and beliefs were years ahead of her time and set a precedent for women’s rights activists for years to come. She is co-founder of the Women’s Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union and even fought for men’s rights. Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s bravery is present during her time at Harvard, during her pregnancy, and during her activism for not just women’s rights but people’s rights.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s heroic traits: wisdom, strength, and bravery have paved the way for her career, her life, and have allowed her to break down walls set up by close minded men. Ginsburg is a well educated woman who uses her knowledge to her advantage. Her wisdom made her a woman of ‘firsts’. This showed other young women during that time that succeeding in a male dominant world was possible. After college she continued to use her strength during her time as a law clerk and professor. She knew she was being treated unfairly in the workplace and persevered, later getting rightful compensation. Bravery is my favorite trait of Ginsburg’s. She fought for the same respect as men and kept her head up during her education at Harvard. She fought for her right to be pregnant in the workplace as well as fair treatment during a pregnancy. Lastly, she fought for the young women of today, making their climb to ambitious careers a little easier. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an inspiration of mine and to so many other women seeking equality; To this day she still stands for equal rights and lets them guide her decision making.

 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been a supreme court justice for over twenty-three years and has done so many amazing things before her induction in 1993. Ginsburg, a Brooklyn native, was raised by two immigrant parents who taught her the importance of being independent and having a good education. After losing her mother to ovarian cancer in high school, Ginsburg continued to work hard and graduated top of her class; She was later accepted into three ivy league colleges. She jumped over countless hurdles pushed in front of her simply because of her gender. Ginsburg continued to push through the race and crossed the finish line a better person because of those obstacles. Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s entire life exemplifies the heroic traits of true wisdom, undeniable strength in the face of adversity, and bravery during difficult situations.

 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s heroic traits have paved the way for her career, her life, and have allowed her to break down walls set up by close minded men. Ginsburg is a well educated woman who uses her knowledge to her advantage. Her wisdom made her a woman of ‘firsts’. This showed other young women during that time that succeeding in a male dominant world was possible. After college she continued to use her strength during her time as a law clerk and professor. She knew she was being treated unfairly in the workplace and persevered, later getting rightful compensation. Bravery is my favorite trait of Ginsburg’s. She fought for the same respect as men and kept her head up during her education at Harvard. She fought for her right to be pregnant in the workplace as well as fair treatment during a pregnancy. Lastly, she fought for the young women of today, making their climb to ambitious careers a little easier. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an inspiration of mine and to so many other women seeking equality; To this day she still stands for equal rights and lets them guide her decision making.



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