My Cousin Nathan's Teachers at Heartspring This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

By
     My heroes are people who make a difference one day at a time. These are the special aides who help disabled and mentally challenged youth. They may not seem like heroes to some, but to me they are in very important ways. Just think, if you were a child who had frequent seizures, you wouldn't have a normal life or many friends. You might never drive a car or be able to live on your own. Wouldn't you love to have someone teach you and help you master everyday tasks? Well, the people who are my heroes do just that.

My cousin, Nathan, has seizures, and so I know how it is to be around a person with a disability. Although he is kind, he frustrates me and sometimes gets on my nerves, even though I know he can't help it. Nathan developed seizures at the age of two and has had them ever since. He is now 18 and still loves the things he did when he was two or three, like "The Muppets" and balloons. Although he seems extremely happy, you can tell he is frustrated when he can't do something or when someone doesn't understand him.

When Nathan was 16, he went to a school in Kansas called Heartspring. This school doesn't teach subjects like social studies and science, it teaches life skills to help him take care of himself. Their aim is to prepare him to handle life when he turns 21 and must go to a home or another school.

There is a group of teachers who work only with Nathan. They make sure he gets the care and attention he needs. These aides are truly amazing and work with him 24/7.

Nathan has friends at school who have similar problems and many who are worse off. My heart goes out to those kids. What makes this school truly amazing is the wonderful teachers.

My heroes are these people who don't give up on kids with disabilities. They have amazing patience for teaching kids like Nathan. They may not receive the glory or the honor of traditional heroes, but they may have an even more important impact on people like my cousin. A special thank-you to the dedicated men and women who give their all to help Nathan live his life to the fullest. &

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






Join the Discussion

This article has 1 comment. Post your own now!

GirlofLightning said...
Jun. 17, 2015 at 10:53 pm
Thank you so much for sharing! I agree, these people are so important! I have seizures also, although not nearly as severe as your cousin. I wouldn't be able to attend school if it weren't for the wonderful teachers and nurses who are always there! These people give so many opportunities to people who otherwise might not have them!
 
bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback