Invention This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   Two years ago I was waiting for the bus when a light bulb shone brightly above my head. I would no longer have to wait for the bus.

I couldn't bear standing at my bus stop for one more day. At the street corner with me stood a seventh grade bully, an eighth grade wiseguy and a nerd and jock from my own grade. Can you believe, they were ALL boys. One of them even broke my bag.

However as usual the bus came slowly bouncing around the corner. I ran onto it and jumped into the seat next to my best friend. I couldn't wait to put my idea on paper. As the bus pulled into the school's driveway, I gathered my books, but they all fell on the floor. I could feel my face turning tomato red and flame like a fire. I walked carefully off the bus making sure I wouldn't slip. I began to jog since we weren't allowed to run in school. As soon as I neared my classroom, I tripped. I could feel my face swell up as if I had eaten a jalapeno pepper, and I could hear my whole class giggling. I walked into class embarrassed and almost forgot my idea. Quickly I grabbed a piece of paper and started to draw the FLYCHAIR. Almost as soon as I had started class had begun and my teacher threw the paper away.

I felt devastated; I thought that the flychair was the best idea I had ever had. Throughout the morning I could only concentrate on the flychair. In spelling I spelled F...L...Y...C...H...A...I...R instead of ferocious. The history of the wheel in social studies seemed to me like the history of the flychair. As last it was time for recess and I could stay inside and try to draw the flychair again. As I set one foot out of the room, my ears felt excited, for my teacher called my name asking me to stay inside a minute longer.

"Julie, is something bothering you?" questioned my teacher. I didn't know what to say. If I told her I was thinking about the flychair, she would probably become angry and tell me to concentrate on my school work. However, if I told her that nothing was wrong she would ask me why I couldn't understand my work. This was one of the hardest decisions I had ever had to make, but I told the truth, which was a good thing, because my teacher understood and questioned me about it.

"How did you think of this Aflychair'?" Mrs. Smithsen asked.

"Well," I stated, "I'm always so cold and tired waiting at my bus stop, I'm afraid that I'll miss the bus and I always have to walk there earlier and never know when it's going to come."

"That's a good reason. I never really knew what students had to go through every morning. What does the flychair look like and how does it move?"

"Hmmm, it's round like a donut and has a special coating to shield the rain and snow almost like a glass umbrella. There is an edge all the way around that swoops down into seating for eight in a circle. There is a storage area in the middle and underneath. It could move on an invisible wire. It gets from place to place when you program it where to go. You can change directions or speeds at any time by reprogramming or pressing your thumb on a button."

"Julie, I never thought that you had so much to say. You've always been quiet. Do you think you can draw it again?"

"I might be able to, but not as well...Oh well I guess I can."

"Wait a minute, I still have it. I didn't throw it away. I watched you the whole time when you were drawing and I was fascinated."

"You were? Really?" I never thought that a teacher would have been that interested in an idea of mine before. My morning began to improve. n

Edintor's Note: If you have any idea (realistic or imaginary) for an invention or creation, please send it.


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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