The Typewriter, Part I This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   As I look around, contemplating the universe and chewing on my delicious strawberry flavored gum, I realize that the world is not as complicated as we seem to think it is. As a child, I used to think that the world revolved around a big man with a trident in his hand and then I realized that I was confusing my Greek myths with my theories of the universe. Anyway, I sit here feeling deep and philosophical and I know that when I go back and reread this I am going to laugh my head off. But truly, what else is a lonely creature sitting at a typewriter supposed to think about? The world may be crumbling to a halt as we speak yet we are able to carry on with our conversations of what to wear and who is dating whom. It is odd what fancies the minds of young people.

How easily we think we fall in love. All it takes is a little more than a moderate amount of attention from a member of the opposite sex and we have fallen head over heels in love with them. Do the young people of today think something that seems so real and so true is probably nothing more than a split second in the vast spectrum of life in the universe? (I have the urge to scream really loudly and make a vulgar noise but I am trying to repress that compulsion.) I think that typing lessons are a crock because who in their right mind gives a flying maggot about whether or not they can correctly type a thousand words in ten seconds. Not I.

I try to be wise but my sarcastic nature pokes its head in at awkward moments and I say completely ridiculous things. (Bellybutton lint rules.) However, I am merely a fleck of dust in this big dirty household we call our world. The answer, my friends, is blowing in the wind, but where may I ask is the question? To be or not to be, that is the ultimate question. The most common answer to that question being "I haven't the slightest. Not a clue in this world. No way." ( I am being quite redundant. And I think I spelled redundant wrong. Oh dear.)

HDK (0ops, sorry.) What about the child who lies in bed all day eating cookies he shouldn't be eating and cleverly pulling the wool over his mother's eyes. "They are not cookies, Mother, they are FIG NEWTONS!" Ah, a true novice. Wait, that's not the right way to use that word. What a silly rabbit I am. Tricks are for kids!

The clock's persistent ticking reminds me of the pressures that are faced by every person in this world. There are always things to be done, deadlines to meet. How tragic it is that our society is controlled by the mere passing of hours. (I have to use the bathroom. I have been serious for too long.)

I like digital clocks; at least they relieve the pressure of trying to figure out what time it is by counting in fives around the face of a clock. What a curious world we inhabit.

I am completed. Eat your vegetables and try to ignore the standards. Focus on the abnormalities for they make life interesting. Bub bye. c


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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