Attack On America This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.


   I used to sit in history classes, learning about wars and all sorts of other events that hadhappened in the world, and be bored out of my mind. I used to think, The world iscompassionate; only back in the old days did people around the world want to harmothers. That stuff doesn't happen anymore. Little did I know that I would ever beevacuated from school as a precaution because of a terrorist attack in my state.I never thought I would come home and be glued to the television, my eyeswatering from not blinking, just wondering Why? I never imagined trying to do myhome

work while hearing F-16's fly over my house, or saying "I'mscared!" to my father.

To experience an incident that will go down inhistory as one of the most terrible attacks on the United States is alarming.September 11 was the day the world changed. This act of terrorism may prove evenmore destructive than the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. "Freedom itselfwas attacked this morning by a faceless coward, and freedom will bedefended," President Bush proclaimed.

Soon, I felt I had to see thesite for myself. Ryan, my brother, and I drove down to the river frontoverlooking New York City's skyline. What I saw was incomprehensible: Greatclouds of smoke, running from white to gray to black, rose above the ruinedtowers of the World Trade Center. I wondered, Now what will people look at inamazement while crossing the Tappan Zee Bridge? I stood there almost weeping, myhand over my mouth in shock.

I don't think I'll ever be bored inhistory class again. Looking back on the events that occurred that tragic day, Igo to school now eager to learn not only history, but all subjects. Sitting inclass, I realize, is more than just passing a test. It's about bringing studentsto a greater understanding of the world and how it operates. There is a purpose:to be aware of remarkable leaders who guided countries in times of crisis, whileother leaders guided countries in business, science and education. As PatrickHenry summed up, "I know no way of judging the future but by thepast.

This day will stay in my memory forever. President Bush ended hisspeech that horrid day with the words, "The resolve of our great nation isbeing tested. But make no mistake, we will show the world that we will pass thistest." And from this point on, as every bell rings ending history class, Iwalk out proud to be part of a nation that will overcome.




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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