Teenagers Behind The Wheel This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   For many years in New Hampshire teenagers have been getting their license at the age of sixteen. I received my license when I reached that wonderful age. The first thing I did was take a spin. I picked my brother up after baseball practice. My parents told me I couldn't drive friends for awhile, but within a few days I was driving them around. It's almost scary how much freedom you gain from that laminated picture and how much control your parents lose in that short time.

The driving school where I went for instruction is now out of business because the instructor was too easy. The teacher allowed me to receive my license with only six driving hours and a few missed classes, even though the state requires eight hours of driving experience.

Many of my friends drive like maniacs and could easily kill themselves, or others. On the other hand, most of my friends drive safely and wouldn't put themselves or others at risk. Age is not the problem. The problem is the licensing system.

Skill should be needed to earn a license. In my class about a third of the teenagers did not deserve to get a license. They didn't know the rules of the road, the mechanics of a car, and they basically didn't know how to drive. These are the people who get their cars on the front pages of newspapers.

The best way to receive knowledge of driving is by driving. New Hampshire allows teenagers to start driving at fifteen and a half with a licensed adult. But if the parent does not insist that the kid drive as much as possible, then he or she will not get enough practice. ?


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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