Mayor of this town

November 2, 2017
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In every town, county, district, etc. there are problems. Some are bigger than others, such as the difference between a cracked sidewalk to the total destruction of a main street bridge.  Obviously the bridge would be more impactful on everyone in the town because people need to get home to their families after work or to pick up their kids from school. But, what about that crack in the sidewalk that affect the husband and wife pushing their baby in a stroller?  Is the town mayor not responsible for that as well?

    If I was a the mayor of Jacksonville, Florida, my town, I would address the public school
bus system. I would address the public school bus system because everyday I see children as young as five and six walking to school. The children walk to school in the cold, in the heat, in the rain, and luckily we do not have snow, but the children would walk to school in the snow if they had to. I do not like seeing children walking to school next to busy highways because it is not safe; there are pros to walking to school, but there are more cons then there are pros. If I could address the public bus systems buses would start to run earlier in the morning and run later as well. The busses in my town take one trip a day, but if the busses took two trips a day then most of the children walking on the side of a highway.  Now I say most children will get to the busses, but knowing what I know about children and families, not all of them will make it to the busses.

    As a mayor of a town there are a lot of responsibilities that must be upheld, and I know that I would have to address major problems throughout the process of addressing my own. Mayors traditionally oversee the city's major departments, like the firemen and women and their pay checks/ fire truck care, police and K-9 units, just to name a few jobs the mayor does. The mayor also is in charge of overseeing public county education, which includes transportation departments for the county public schools.  When I am elected for the position of mayor for my town, I will officially make school busses take more than one trip a day to more then one bus stop to ensure the safety of all children, of all ages trying to pursue their education and soon better the community.

    In the council, the mayor, in the form of government, is the leader of a city council however, he or she has no greater official authority other than to be the mayor of the town. After he or she is elected, the new mayor  will serve a four-year term.  The mayor of a town does not  even have authority over other council members in the same town. The mayor's primary responsibility is to decide when to hold council meetings, and act as head of the city. In ceremonial processions the mayor is the head speaking for the town of whom he or she was elected. The mayor's vote as a council member is not of high enough rank to veto anything.

    “Anna K, mayor of Jacksonville, Florida, will address the public school bus system fro her elected term,” I can just hear it on the radio crystal clear. I picture myself standing on the podium as mayor, with my new name, and portraying my ideas to the entire town. Every member of my town will love my idea and, if all goes well then it will be put into action. The crowd will be cheering and screaming my name from their seats. If only I was old enough to run for mayor.






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