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Romeo and Juliet's Death

In William Shakespeare’s play, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, there are several characters foremost accountable for the death of Romeo and Juliet. In the first place, Juliet’s nurse is a liable individual to deal with this situation. She tells Juliet to marry Romeo but then the nurse decided to alternate her thoughts to let her walk down the aisle with Paris. At first, Juliet trusted her but since her parents are influencing her to marry Paris as well, the nurse jumps in to make everyone feel enhanced; at the same time it is pressuring Juliet. Similarly, Juliet’s parents coveys her to wed Paris, a mature man. Juliet brags to her parents not to because covertly she has already married Romeo and they do not know about it. Since Juliet’s parents have a misleading judgment of adulthood, this causes Juliet to have a breakdown on which she states to them that she will execute herself if she marries Paris. Lastly, Juliet is blamable for the loss of Romeo and herself. She chose to drink the potion and tricked her family to thinking she was dead but instead she was in a deep sleep. When Romeo found Juliet after her funeral, he slayed himself with poison to be with her; Juliet then woke up to see Romeo deceased so she attempted to stab herself with a sword. In the final analysis, Juliet, Juliet’s parents, and Juliet’s nurse are the ones utmost authoritative for Romeo and Juliet’s demise in William Shakespeare’s play.



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