The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerals

June 6, 2011
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The book of The Great Gatsby views the significance of the1920's and describes how women behaved in the 1920's. lt was written by F. scott Fitzgerald. The most interesting aspect of the book is how the character of Daisy acts towards each of the main characters and shows the traits of how she would be known as a traditional wife. According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy shows many ways of
being a traditional wife such as dependency, having kids, and acting dumber than her husband even if she is smart.

According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy shows many ways of being a traditional wife such as having a kid. The only nontraditional part of it is the nurse takes care of Daisy's daughter, but Daisy still loves her daughter. Daisy explains to Gatsby and Nick where her daughter gets her looks from. "She doesn't look like her father," explains Daisy, "she looks like me. She's got my hair and shape of face"(Fitzgerald 117). Daisy explains that Pam looks more like her than like her father. Pam's facial features look more like Daisy's. The features that are similar between Daisy and her daughter are her hair and shape of face. She claims to have said this because she cares about her looks and her daughter's looks. Daisy is rich so she would want her child to look the part, which means that she cares more about looks than she should but in a subtle way. At this point, the nurse comes in and has Pam leave the room with her. This suggests that Daisy knows her family well and knows where Pam got her looks from. The feminist criticism lens explains a traditional wife's behavior towards their children and in a few ways Daisy fits that behavior. This also suggests that the nurse takes care of Daisy along with Pam. Having kids is a way of acting as a traditional wife, so according to the feminist criticism lens Daisy's behavior supports that role.

According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy shows many ways of being a traditional wife such as acting dumb and giddy so Tom looks smart. Daisy's personality differs in these ways depending on whether her husband is with her or not. To make Tom smart, Daisy acts dumb when they are together. When Tom and Daisy are separate, Daisy's intelligence shows. "Holding down the receiver," Daisy said cynically to Jordan and Nick (116). Although, when Tom is together with Daisy, she acts more excited and a bit dumb. "Make us a cold drink," cried Daisy to Tom (116). When Tom is on the phone, Daisy is listening in on the call, thinking that Tom is talking to his mistress, Myrtle. She believes that he's "holding down" the receiver. This is where she tries to seem smart. When he gets back from the call, she asks him to make drinks in more of an excited tone. She is either smart when she's not with Tom or acts dumb and more excited about stuff when she is with Tom. The feminist criticism lens demonstrated that the husband should be smarter than his wife, and Daisy is only smart when Tom is not around. This demonstrates that because Daisy doesn't show that she is smart around Tom she is acting as a traditional wife.

According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy shows many ways of being a traditional wife such as being dependent on her husband. Daisy usually depends on Tom to make final decisions. She is not the one to get everyone to make a move. "But it's hot, and everything's confused. Let's all go to town," says Daisy to Tom (118). "Come On! What's the matter anyhow? lf we're going to town let's start," says Tom to Daisy (119). lt's a summer day and Daisy is very hot so she wants to go into town with Gatsby, Tom, Nick, and Jordan. She goes to Tom and asks him if they could go, and they do. The point is that she doesn't think for herself and lets Tom think and decide for her. This means that she doesn't make the decisions and depends on Tom to decide.

According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy needs to be dependent on her husband to be a traditional wife. When Fitzgerald wrote this book he intended to teach his readers how traditional wives behave in the 1920s. To decide that she wants her daughter to be raised by the nurse she has to depend on Tom to give approval for that to happen. According to the feminist criticism lens, this whole time Daisy has been acting as a traditional wife.

According to the feminist criticism lens, Daisy shows many ways of acting as a traditional wife such as, being dependent on their husband, giddy over smart, and having a daughter. The feminist criticism lens illustrates the ways that helped shape Daisy's character to become a traditional wife. Daisy showed different personalities throughout the novel. She acted differently depending on the person she is talking to. She was dependent towards Tom. She was smart to Nick. She was straight up giddy towards Jordan. She loves her daughter no matter what anyone thinks. Daisy has a unique set of personalities that her friends and family love or don't love about her. Tom, Nick, and Jordan are the people Daisy feels the closest to, so she's not afraid to have multiple personalities.





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Sassafrax said...
Mar. 18, 2012 at 6:55 pm
you raised up some very good points, however there were some repetitiveness that bothered me when i read this, such as starting paragraphs with "according to the feminist criticism lens".
 
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