The Gun-Control Debate: Public Safety vs. Civil Rights

November 8, 2017

On a quiet Sunday morning in November 2017, a gunman entered First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, and opened fire into the unsuspecting congregation. The small church in the small town of less than 700 citizens lost 26 individuals that day. Half of the victims were children.


Fourteen-year-old Annabelle Renee Pomeroy was one of these victims. She was the adopted daughter of Pastor Frank Pomeroy and his wife, Sherri. Her father spoke of Annabelle as “one very beautiful, special child.” Annabelle was a typical teen, loved by all who knew her, attending church when she was suddenly and maliciously taken from the world. The loss of a loved one is hard to imagine.


Attacks like this raise lots of questions around gun-control and mental health. Would the situation have been different if the shooter, who had mental health issues and a violent criminal past, hadn’t been able to purchase the weapon he used? The Supreme Court has ruled that any person who has committed an act of domestic abuse/violence—even misdemeanor offenses—is banned from purchasing or owning guns. Who should be held accountable for this type of oversight? How can we prevent horrific events like this from happening in the future?


President Trump stated that this issue is “a mental health problem at the highest level,” but that this incident was not due to “a guns situation.” He also stated it was fortunate that “somebody else had a gun that was shooting in the opposite direction. Otherwise it would’ve been—as bad as it was—it would’ve been much worse.”


Politicians, political advocates, and lobbyist groups are in a constant battle to determine what kind of gun-control measures, if any, need to be enforced in our country; many activists are fighting for better screening processes for those who show signs of mental health issues. However, is there a case for a few “bad apples” causing the country to have to restrict what some believe to be their Second Amendment right?


How does hearing news like this shooting affect you? Does your family or someone you know own a gun? Do you believe in the Constitutional right to bear arms? Do you think that there should be stricter limits or more relaxed regulations on purchasing, selling, owning, and using firearms? How do you cope when these tragedies happen, and how can you help others cope or heal?


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Join the Discussion

This article has 7 comments. Post your own now!

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ said...
today at 9:20 am
lol where them facts
 
sashimiisfish said...
today at 8:09 am
Some of the reasons accidents happen involving guns is because of people not taking gun safety courses. We don’t need to take away guns, just make sure people know how to use them properly.
 
Killerworm990 said...
Nov. 20 at 8:52 pm
Gun Ownership is a right. 99% of people who commit gun crime got those guns that they used illegally. We will never be able to limit how many guns the criminals have, but if law abiding citizens purchase guns, we can severely limit what the criminals can do with those guns
 
The_Typist_This teenager is a 'regular' and has contributed a lot of work, comments and/or forum posts, and has received many votes and high ratings over a long period of time. said...
Nov. 13 at 3:59 pm
If a young child runs around the house with a dangerous object, does the parent also grab a dangerous object to protect themselves? No. They control the situation, take the object away from the child and make sure that that situation never happens again. Why is this logic not being applied to the Second Amendment? (by the way, amend means 'to change'. The Second Amendment was created to be amended)
 
Killerworm990 replied...
Nov. 20 at 8:50 pm
Gun Ownership is a right. Anyone who thinks all guns should be banned is retarted. But their voice should not be silenced, as the first amendment protects free speech
 
Bruvton replied...
Nov. 23 at 6:28 am
If a child is running around with a dangerous object, you take that object away from the child, not the human race. You should not generalise the human race because of a child. You should, however, make sure that people not qualified for that dangerous object do not get that object, such as giving people background checks. Plus, the amendments were made for the people to make sure the government would not try to assume total control or take away their freedoms. However, guns only made for killin... (more »)
 
Realjay41This teenager is a 'regular' and has contributed a lot of work, comments and/or forum posts, and has received many votes and high ratings over a long period of time. said...
Nov. 9 at 4:50 pm
It's terrible! I was in a school shooting at my high school. I had thought that my life of a highway was going to end without me reaching my dreams.
 
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