Indiana Jones

April 8, 2012
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“Shoving my nose into my iPod” was not looked upon as respectable in my household—especially in the eyes of my mother. As probably assumed by the reader, my iconoclastic beliefs that this was beneficial to my health caused me to dream-up a rife of reasons why using an iPod in the ways I use it is more favorable to not using it at all. Naturally, this triggered a plethora of various frays with my mother. One particular day when we were driving in the car, we whipped past a building entitled “Two River Titles.” Perplexed, I asked my mother what that building’s purpose was. She ignored me. Thinking that she might’ve not heard me, I asked again. Still nothing. A new argument exploded in my head:

“Sometimes I need to use my iPod to look-up what things mean, like that building, because you don’t tell me,” I explained proudly to my mother. This caused another fight in our Volvo Station Wagon to break out. However, just as fast as it began, it ended. In the quiet before the storm of our next squabble, I thought about what just occurred between me and my mother. The car was placid; we were out on a nice drive before that battle I instigated ruined everything. Then a new thought occurred to me--- perhaps humans can only achieve great happiness when ignorant. The main reason I use my iPod is to acquire more knowledge; my mother and I wouldn’t be fighting if this wasn’t so. If I wasn’t educated, I couldn’t keep spitting out reasons why my mother was wrong in our various fights. My mind then flicked to an old Indiana Jones movie I recalled watching. A woman is literally destroyed because she sought to know everything in the universe; it was too much. Could it have been "Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull"? Regardless, Indiana Jones had actually helped me to learn my own lesson; ignorance is bliss. To me in this very moment and possibly the future, Indiana Jones matters.





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