Slashing Stereotypes

June 27, 2010
By AbstractArtist101 SILVER, Cedar Grove, New Jersey
AbstractArtist101 SILVER, Cedar Grove, New Jersey
6 articles 1 photo 9 comments

Favorite Quote:
"You can make a thousand guesses about what will happen next, but in reality, there's only one outcome."
-Myself


Do all jocks really earn nothing more than C’s on their tests? Are all artists nutcases, who feel that getting high creates better art? Just because an individual may come across as ugly, does that mean they are bad news? Do all minorities receive public assistance and commit crimes? Do spiky bracelets mean, “Here comes trouble?” Are certain ethnic groups smarter than others? Are little girls weird if they like Hot Wheels instead of Barbies?

Although Americans are considered notorious for these stereotypes, a lot of biases exist in all countries, cities, homes, and even classrooms. Aside from a fishbowl, any place where different groups intercalate, stereotypes exist on some level. My middle school is a glaring example…

Ever since elementary school, I have never displayed myself as a conformist—from wearing camouflage to partaking in Yu-Ghi-Oh! duels. As the years zoomed by, classmates began stereotyping me for reasons people should be actually proud of. My eager participation in classes has most likely earned me nerd status, which is nothting to be ashamed of. Wearing short cheerleader skirts has never been my key to success. I would rather learn the Rubik’s Cube, draw an abstract, or teach myself to play “Landslide” on the piano. My ambitions do not include acquiring Bebe Sport clothing or a jumbo Juicy Couture bag. Who cares if the popular crowd disapproves of my Alice Cooper T-shirt and Andy Warhol purse? On top of being a “different” type of person, some people feel that my below-par gym skills automatically grant them permission to harass me or just think less of me.

The list of stereotypes people may have about me—weird, nerdy, athletically challenged — have fueled my resentment and triggered the development of my own stereotypes about those who will not accept me. I sometimes assume that jocks’ obsession with football and other sports automatically means their grades are below par. Anytime a girl with designer names stamped on her bag, clothing, and boots walks past me, I assume she is shallow and desperate for acceptance and popularity. While many boys and girls at my school may fall into those categories, the truth is, not all of them do. Perhaps they happen to like that style of clothing or have a real passion for sports, but they may even have some nonconformist tendencies of their own. How do I know?

Without getting to know a person, I cannot know. Just as illnesses such as cancer or AIDS eat away at a person’s body, stereotypes are a sort of sickness, too. They wear down a person’s character and make them blind to people’s worthwhile traits, causing them to reject or even ridicule those, like me, who are different. They cause ugly prejudices and even world wars.

Eradicating stereotypes would enable us to see each other in entirely different ways, in the classroom and beyond. People of certain religions would not be persecuted or terrorized. Employers would see skills, not skin color or gender. So, is it strange for a little girl to like Hot Wheels more than Barbies? If you consider that a silly question, then you are on the road to change.


The author's comments:
This piece mostly focuses on how stereotypes always exist on some level, whether it be as small as a classroom, or as large as a whole nation. It gives a true story on how these biases effect me, and what I think of stereotypes because of the impact they have had on me over the years.

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This article has 9 comments.


Jenny said...
on Sep. 22 2010 at 1:41 pm
Dear AbstractArtist101,
in your article "Slashing Stereotypes" you wrote about boys and girls who fall into boxes.
I really like your article because you describe very typical situations in the school!
I entirely agree with you when you write that the most people are called weird if the like Hot Wheels instead of Barbies.
You also wrote that stereotypes are a sort of sickness, like AIDS or cancer. Here I agree with you, too.
The teenagers put different people into boxes without knowing a person, because if they not listen to the right music and wear the right labels they are called as "uncool" or even the people suffer in bullying. Because of that the most people don't introduces themselves to belong to the "cool" groups.

Finally I want to say thank you for this really nice and honest article!

Yours, Jenny

jenny123 said...
on Sep. 22 2010 at 1:41 pm
Dear AbstractArtist101,
in your article "Slashing Stereotypes" you wrote about boys and girls who fall into boxes.
I really like your article because you describe very typical situations in the school!
I entirely agree with you when you write that the most people are called weird if the like Hot Wheels instead of Barbies.
You also wrote that stereotypes are a sort of sickness, like AIDS or cancer. Here I agree with you, too.
The teenagers put different people into boxes without knowing a person, because if they not listen to the right music and wear the right labels they are called as "uncool" or even the people suffer in bullying. Because of that the most people don't introduces themselves to belong to the "cool" groups.

Finally I want to say thank you for this really nice and honest article!

Yours, Jenny

Alina said...
on Sep. 22 2010 at 12:11 pm

Dear AbstractArtist101,

in your article from below you deal with stereotypes who cause heavy damage to human communal life as well as to teenager's development in school.

I really enjoyed reading your article which contains a lot of personal information presenting the big problems of school life like bullying or social isolation. Even though i got to know some of these stereotypes and prejudices by myself,  I absolutely agree with your opinion that one neither should judge people from the first impression nor pigeon-hole them without trying to get to now them better and from their true side.

One point I found rather harsh was your comparison of stereotypes with AIDS and cancer which I found very problematic and exaggerated.

Finally your conclusion is totally right and I like it alot, still I think its unfortunately very unrealistic and just not possible in our modern, globalized times.

Thank you for sharing this very truthful and honest article!

Alina


StephanJ said...
on Sep. 21 2010 at 3:02 pm
StephanJ, Entenhausen, New York
0 articles 0 photos 1 comment

Favorite Quote:
-

Dear AbstractArtist101
in your article about slashing stereotypes you wrote about the disadvantages of stereotypes and you wrote about the consequences. I entirely agree with you when you write that we put everybody into boxes without knowing the person. Another argument against stereotyping is that stereotypes cause ugly prejudices and even world wars. I can strongly support the author's view that it's strange for a little girl to like Hot Wheels more than Barbies. What we also need to consider is that stereotypes wear down a person's character and make them blind to people's worthwhile traits. A good solution could be to accept that only the character of a person is important.
Yours Stephan

on Sep. 19 2010 at 11:53 am
AbstractArtist101 SILVER, Cedar Grove, New Jersey
6 articles 1 photo 9 comments

Favorite Quote:
"You can make a thousand guesses about what will happen next, but in reality, there's only one outcome."
-Myself

Thanks for liking my article so much! I'm glad I received such positive feedback from you. By the way, my the author, (me), is a she :) LOL, but that's okay though

thilo said...
on Sep. 19 2010 at 11:34 am
thilo, Paris, Other
0 articles 0 photos 1 comment

Favorite Quote:
i dont know



I am writing about the article on stereotypes. I entirely agree with the author when he writes that at any place where different groups intercalate, stereotypes exist on some level. I wish to write about the article which makes mostly totally true claims about stereotypes. He writes that stereotypes are a sort of sickness.He also writes that grils are weird if they like Hot Wheels instead of Barbies, which I can agree with, too. Furthermore he writes that stereotyping people wears down a person's character and makes them blind to people's worthwhile traits which is true. He also make suggestions for avoiding stereotypical thinking like for example that without thinking in stereotypes, people of certain religions would not be persecuted or terrorized. To sum up, I'd like to point out that your text is very nice, true and insightful too.

Thilo


on Jul. 4 2010 at 12:15 pm
AbstractArtist101 SILVER, Cedar Grove, New Jersey
6 articles 1 photo 9 comments

Favorite Quote:
"You can make a thousand guesses about what will happen next, but in reality, there's only one outcome."
-Myself

To me, I could relate to it a lot because I have similar problems at school--no one is really like me.

on Jul. 2 2010 at 10:31 am
AbstractArtist101 SILVER, Cedar Grove, New Jersey
6 articles 1 photo 9 comments

Favorite Quote:
"You can make a thousand guesses about what will happen next, but in reality, there's only one outcome."
-Myself

Thanks for your feedback. Your writing is very good! So far I've read dear confused teenager

on Jul. 2 2010 at 4:20 am
Chinadoll BRONZE, Dallas, Texas
3 articles 0 photos 172 comments

Very nice. So true and insightful too. Awesome!

Also would you look at some of my work? Some similar to this. Thanks



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