Feedback on “Waves”

April 25, 2018

“Waves”, by Nigel Becker, is a thorough and well-written review of Rachel Platten’s album, “Waves”. Becker informs readers of the pros and cons of Platten’s songs, giving valid reasons for each opinion. Becker believes that most of Platten’s songs lack an original theme, meaning that she wrote about topics that were written about much more than once. As well, Becker stated that her song lyrics sometimes closely resemble that of other artists. For example, Becker points out that Platten’s lyrics “Who told you you could put band-aids over broken heads to fix the mess you made” from the song “Loose Ends” sounds very much like Taylor Swift’s lyrics “Band-aids don’t fix bullet holes” from her song “Bad Blood.” As well, Becker states that most of Platten’s songs, especially her ballads, contain lyrics that are “melancholy, relatable, and totally forgettable.” Although it is a pro that Platten’s songs are relatable, Becker believes she writes about topics that many other artists have already explored, which may take away some interest towards the songs for some listeners. However, Becker does give recommendations towards is own personal favorite songs in the album, while also keeping an open mind and recommending other songs for listeners who may be more invested in Platten’s songs than he was because of their taste in music. From this, readers, including myself, can easily determine whether or not it would be worth it to download Platten’s new album, or whether to stick to only certain songs. I believe that Becker open-mindedness allows readers to get a sense of what sort of song they would like to hear, or whether they’d like to hear any at all. Although his view on “Waves” is, for the most part, negative, he manages to state the pros of her album as well, giving readers two different perspectives towards Platten’s album. In conclusion, Nigel Becker’s review on Rachel Platten’s new album, “Waves” is one that gives readers multiple reasons as to why they should listen to the songs and why they shouldn’t, despite Becker’s view on the album to be mostly negative. As well, it allows reads to choose for themselves whether or not they want to listen to Platten’s album, or whether they only want to listen to only certain songs.  The review is well-written and thorough, portraying Becker’s ability to stay open-minded towards others.






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