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Art by. Maya

I was impressed yet again by the February edition of Teen Ink. Ever since the increased appearance of anime in the magazine, I have been keeping a close eye on anything that is even slightly related to it. Usually, I just glance at the artwork and then move on but this month, the wondrous art by Maya drew in my attention. I continuously stared at it for minutes, deciphering all the meanings that could possibly be behind it. I first took in the detailed features of her picture. What I felt was most striking was how the black haired character was fading away as he held someone. It was as though he was a deceased person and the brunette he was hugging is mourning his death. The way the character is fading away into the light makes me think that he is being dragged into the afterlife and the person he is holding does not want him to go.

The way parts of the black haired man are in the light and makes a trail to him makes it seem like the light is pulling him towards itself. The expression he is sporting tends to provoke a certain type of sympathy inside of me and I unknowingly end up tearing. It is as if the man does not want to leave either but has to. This picture is of the parting between two people who are closely connected. It portrays the heartbreaking scene of death trying to pull two individuals that think deeply of each other apart. The shading and color choice is perfect and the image of him fading away is remarkable. This piece of art also is a form of anime and holds so many different shows that I know.

Her art just holds so much meaning to me. Others might see it as just two people hugging or a random picture but it is actually so much more. This picture tells a story that specifically sets out to conjure the emotion of sadness. I studied the scene and found myself to be clutching at the paper to hold in the tears. Yes, it’s just a picture but it pertains to so many people in the world that unfortunately understand the experience of losing someone dear to them. The face that the black haired man had was definitely how someone would look after long hours of crying. Such minuscule details are the things that pull the art together and make it truly complete. Maya, thank you for creating something that plays a movie without actually moving.



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