I'm In Therapy, But I'm Not Crazy

Whomever made the connection between therapy and crazy people, must have been crazy themselves. I’m here to tell you one thing: I love therapy. Contrary to what the word therapy generally implies, I’m not crazy. I’m far from it, in my opinion.

In the field of psychology, therapy is beneficial to those whose expectations are risen to their highest. I never went into therapy with the highest of expectations, but soon after my first few sessions, I began to “up the anty” and raise my expectations. As with any situation, you must go into it with the expectations YOU set for yourself - not what someone else sets for you. Mange your expectations. That’s usually the key to get what you want.

Therapy does not always mean depression, schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, or anything along those lines. People resort to therapy for a variety of reasons. I did happen to enlist my trust in my therapist for depression reasons (and becoming involved with someone I shouldn’t have), but it does not mean I’m still heading down that path. I was cured about a year ago with the guidance of my therapist. I don’t bang my head against the wall, question my existence (well, I do that most days but not all days), nor do I sporadically raise my voice for no apparent reason. Some might call that crazy. Some people might also associate that with “the crazy lady that goes to therapy.” I go to therapy because I, myself, decided to go. I wanted something more in my life and I felt therapy would offer that to me. I was right.

I’ll admit not ever session in therapy has been of use to me, but my therapist has done her best to ensure I’m headed down the correct path. There are moments when my parents insight just won’t cut it. I, by no means, use my therapist as a crutch or substitute for my parents. Every once in a while, don’t you go to your friends for advice? Well, instead of ME always going to my friends for advice, I go to my therapist. I don’t feel like I have many friends in the first place. The advice I’d get from some of my friends would be short-lived. To the few friends I do confide in, I thank you.
She [my therapist] isn’t a stranger to me like your school counselor or coach may be. She’s the kind-hearted person I’m paying her to be. Now, that may come across as being harsh, but she does do her job - whether or not the face she puts on is real... or fake.

I must say that sharing this information with people is difficult for me. People look at my face, my lifestyle, my grades, my this, my that and never stop to think I might be in therapy. I’d also like to point out that not many people share they’re in therapy simple because they’re afraid.
I’m here to tell you right off the bat that “looking at certain way” has nothing to do with whether or not that person is in therapy. Therapy is a private matter. Everyone thinks, speaks, lives and thrives in different ways. No one way is correct. No one way is incorrect. Some people don’t feel the need to talk to strangers, but I do. Take this for what it is: therapy is a personal choice. It’s not for everyone, but it might be for you. Who knows? I know I don’t know. Do you?
Unlike what you might see in the movies, I'm not on my way to write a sad poem in my journal or strum away at my ukulele. I'm off to indulge myself in some reading. School assigned reading, that is.





Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback