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Aspergers Syndrome

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When I came screaming into the world I was welcomed with open arms of family and friends: the usual. My childhood was full of cherry popsicles stained faces, too-toos, and Florida vacations: the usual. When I went to elementary school boys had cooties, pre-test were all about getting the star stickers and recesses went by too quickly: the usual. The year I went to middle school was the same year my younger brother, Kevin, entered fourth grade and was in the process of being diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome: unusual.

At a young age Kevin had problems with speech and motor skills. This was recognized and he was recommended for Early Childhood. Early Childhood was a preschool of 12 kids, unlike mine, of 25 kids a class. At the time not much was thought of it, my parents were told he would improve and would be able to be with the rest of the kids his age for kindergarten.

Unfortunately, elementary school for Kevin was hell. Kids teased him, he was bullied, and often he would be the one sent to the principles office for retaliating. As the school years became worst and worst my parents became more worried and contacted doctors. After dozens of doctors, bills, and misdiagnoses it was concluded that Kevin had Aspergers Syndrome.

Aspergers Syndrome is a neurological disorder, not behavioral, and is similar to High-Functioning Autism. In Kevin’s case, he is not sociable and also has OCD. As a result of my brother being bullied, made fun of, and appearing ‘weird’ or different has only made me a stronger person.

Since Kevin does not have friends we have our ‘us’ days were the two of us go to Best Buy (store of Kevin’s choosing), Panera’s Bread, and a movie. I have taken it on myself to get Kevin out of the house and into the community. Most recently, Kevin and I joined the Robotics team this fall and I am hoping it will bring us closer as brother and sister along with increasing Kevin’s ability to work with others and communicate.

The school year Kevin was diagnosed was the most stressful year of my 17 years of living. When most of my parent’s attention was focused on Kevin I learned to be more independent and be a source of support for the family. I also learned to stand up for others who may have disguisable disabilities. You never really know what someone’s story may tell; to you you may have thought this was going to be the usual.





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GirlW/AnOpinion said...
May 5, 2011 at 10:18 pm
Bethani is right! Kevin is lucky to have you unfortunatly most are not! I know this to be true because my sister has aspergers and i have to admit i'm not the best person for her to be around... But i'm trying harder to help her... and i'm trying harder to understand her and be there for her... if you have any tips.... they would be very much appreciated! Thank you so much for writing this!
 
Bethani said...
Jun. 14, 2010 at 11:15 pm
Your brother is lucky to have someone like you. :)
 
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