A Special Friend This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   A Special Friend

by H. G., Quincy, MA

When I first met David I never thought that such a little boy could have such an impact on my life. David was one of the hundreds of kids I taught at a track club in my town where I volunteered over summer vacation.

It took me a few days to notice that David was in the group I had been assigned to. He was very shy at first yet he seemed eager to learn and to be a good runner. He just played and ran around with the other kids; he had yet to say anything to me. But for some reason on this particular day, David came up to me and started asking me questions like How old are you?, Where do you go to school?, What's your name again? and other questions pertaining to me. I answered all of his questions and then I looked at him and said, "Why do you want to know all of these things about me anyway?" "I just like to know stuff about my friends," he responded as he went running back to his group. This was the day that David and I first came in contact; this was the day that the bond between us began to form.

Every day after that David and I were always together at track. He would come to see me when I was working with the older kids, usually he would just tap me on the back and run away even though he also made sure that I knew he was doing it. Also he would always say good-bye to me when he left.

I found myself always cheering for David. At races I would wait for him at the finish line cheering him on the whole way. Once he finished I would give him a high-five or a hug and tell him what a great job he did and how proud I was of him.

Soon it was time for me to say good-bye. I knew it was going to be difficult but I knew it had to be done. When I told him I was leaving he just looked at me and asked me why. After I explained the situation to him I gave him a big hug. I didn't want to let go but I knew I had to. I also knew I would never forget him.

Volunteering at the track club was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. Because of it I met David, whom I now realize has changed the way I look at life forever. I now realize that some of the most important work a person does is work that you do not get paid for, but rather work you do for others for no reason other than to be a good person and give back to your community. Having a person look up to you and depend on you the way David looked up to me and depended on me is worth no monetary value. The bond between the two of us will last forever in my heart. I will never forget the time I spent with my special friend.


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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