A Firefighter's Story This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

By
   Being a firefighter isn't as easy as most think. It's hard work. It is also the most stressful job in the United States. Two years ago I joined the local department when I turned 14. My first big call was an out-of-district brush fire. When we arrived, about 45 acres had been burned. The first thing on your mind is - what can I do? Next is - will I get hurt? Luckily, the flame had already been quenched. Then we began the gruesome task of mopping-up. This includes forestry hose you wrap in your arms in a figure-eight shape.

At the peak of winter, we got the dreaded call - a house fire. When the first unit pulled up on scene, the house had already been destroyed. The people living in the house had smelled fire 45 minutes earlier. Instead of calling us, the homeowner decided to try to put the fire out himself. This cost valuable time. He also opened windows, which was the worst thing to do. Luckily, no one was injured.

Most people also don't realize that fear makes you think out the situation carefully. Some firefighters aren't so lucky though. In Providence, one man was buried underneath a flight of basement stairs (on fire).

Being a firefighter also is fun! I am a member of the muster team. This team's goal is to run, connect hoses together, and run to a finish line (and fastest time wins). Another event is doing this, but instead, running to a finish line that water runs through. It is a competition not to let the hose "blow out."

If there is a volunteer department around, check the age requirement, If you can, apply, and it will improve your life just as much as it has mine. fl


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback