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Bullying: Different Perspectives

“True terror is to wake up one morning and discover that your high school class is running the country.”
? Kurt Vonnegut

Anyone who has watched a movie is well aware of “the bully” stereotype. They are the adversary to cause conflict for our supportive main character. Usually people portray them as incompetent fools incapable of going through life. But today in the real world bullies have become a threat. The problem was once brushed aside as something that “just happens” or “builds character”. It was not until recently that people officially decided to take a stand and stick a cork in this problem. But because of the serious tone that school shootings and suicides have set it’s suggested that bullying should be considered a crime one should be jailed for.

Speaking as someone who was bullied, one must wonder if that is entirely necessary. Do they deserve to go that far? This is my perspective: It began in elementary school with simple twists of my name and mere taunts. It only escalated later in middle school when they discovered swear words and violence. I could only imagine what new form the harassment they would have chosen once I entered high school. But when I prepared myself for the oncoming slander, something strange occurred. It was so subtle that I hadn’t fully detected it until I looked back. The taunts, threats, daily mocking of my name just simply… stopped. It’s as if entering high school was the apple of awareness that caused all who ate from it to grow up. That, or perhaps they became bored with me once they discovered drugs and sex.

I understand that this is a rare occurrence and the situation usually becomes its worst for the victim by high school. It is difficult to stop bullying. Bullying stems from a resentment of abnormalities in our society. It is, from their perspective, forcing their ideals of “normal” or “acceptable” onto those who don’t exhibit such qualities. To stop bullying at its core is to change our entire view of culture. But inevitably these kids become adults that integrate into society. I feel some realize their mistakes and focus on their own life, like my fellow classmates, but others retain their patterns of exclusive social gatherings and ridicule of those beneath them. This leads to the victims becoming so emotionally distraught they feel their only means of escape is to extinguish their lives.


So does life truly become better? Of course it does, but it will never be exactly how we’d like it. Life is a series of trials and tribulations we must overcome. What these kids must understand is to accept their differences since it molds them into who they are. The bullies, on the other hand, should somehow learn to be more understanding people. There should be a method to teach them this without forcing it onto them.


There is a way, we just need to see it from every perspective to understand.




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