Multitasking

February 1, 2018

By definition, multitasking means to do two or more things at a time. Not everyone can multitask; it takes lots of practice and skill. According to the journal article “The Multitasking Generation” by Claudia Wallis, the author seems to argue that multitasking is limited to young adults – “when people try to perform two or more related tasks either at the same time or alternately rapidly between them, errors go way up, and it takes far longer” … (1). The author also goes on to say that it is not a good way of learning. Quite frankly, do you really think you are going to learn something doing two things at the same time?

 

For example, if you decide to take a ballet class and in the middle of class-time you turn on some other music irrelevant to the ballet you are learning, and you start dancing to hip-hop music; do you really think you are going to get better at ballet of you are not taking the actual time to learn and distracting yourself to other things, like switching the music to dance the exact opposite? I think this is the author’s exact points as well. Multitasking can be a bad thing at times – it should only be done in emergency situations.


Another example, driving and answering your phone because you know necessarily need to answer it – examples, someone had an accident, the baby got hurt, or your dad had a heart attack.


Another point the author makes is how teenagers seems to be connected social media and technology when they are interacting with other people. “Many educators and psychologists say parents need to actively ensure that their teenagers break free of compulsive engagement with screens and spend time in the physical company of human being” (2).


I think that in this day and age, we have lost ourselves in the ways of socializing in the social media, such as face book, tweeter, Instagram, etc...


 






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