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Magyck

By , Jaworzno, Poland
Under the harsh glow of the lights, I squinted at the chalkboard to better see the boring dribble my teacher had written there. Oops, he’s not supposed to be called a teacher anymore. Now, he’s a “grand instructor.” Another stupid name from the genetically modified freaks.
“Until you all recite the rules that differ Magyckal beings from humans, you won’t leave this classroom,” The teacher threatened, probably delighted at the prospect of cutting into our limited free time.
Great. Now our teacher-turned-grand instructor thinks just because he has a new name, he has more power over our non-Magyckal butts. Along with the class, I recited the dry text for at least the twentieth time.
“Magyckal beings differ from humans by such traits as increased strength, vision, and a supernatural control of the elements. Physical features include silver eyes, bright pink nails, and fair complexions”- as if I need to know how to spot a weirdo-“and most Magyckal beings do not become so until their 13th birthday”-Great, so I might be sitting with freaks right now-“when they start displaying signs of weak vision and fatigue due to severe changes occurring in their bodies at the time.”
“Now that wasn’t so hard, was it? Magyck Appreciation Hour is over.” As soon as the words were out of the grand instructor’s mouth, I rushed out of the classroom so as to avoid any contact with the class next door, consisting of the freaks, weirdos, and mutants, none of which I wanted to see right now.
“Hey Annie, have you decided which class you’re heading to for seventh hour?” Georgie caught up to me just before I was about to crash into the exit doors. She was a “Magyckal being,” and seemed to consider me as her friend.
“Hey Georgie, you might consider using a little bit of your Magyck to control that acne on your face!” I replied in the same sickening sweet tone as she did. Gosh, she was annoying.
“Well actually, we’re not allowed to use Magyck for stuff like that, but I actually do know a spell that can make all acne disappear,” she chirped, not realizing how much I wanted to get rid of her.
“How about a spell to make you disappear?” I replied before I exited the building, not stopping to catch a glimpse of her dark face. Learning hours weren’t over yet, but now we had a break, so I ran to my favorite spot in the middle of the school park. There stood a large oak, the perfect place for the solitude I saw so little of. I didn’t think anyone else actually knew it was here.

The tree stood in its wizened glory, stretching up to the sky with arms held out almost as if to embrace it. As I looked up at the twisting branches, I felt a need to hug the tree, a silly desire that I knew wouldn’t mean anything, but yet caused me to stretch out my arms, and wrap them around the solid surface, so large I couldn’t join my hands together.

I stayed in that embrace for a while, feeling a warmth, maybe from the sun’s glow, maybe from something within the tree. But I soon realized I had to go back to school, back to classes speaking of how great it was Magyckal beings came out of hiding, and the warmth left me with an abrupt motion, sort of like what happens when someone rips off your blanket, leaving you shivering in the darkness.

Classes had probably started by now, but I was in no hurry to get back to the stifling building with small windows and cramped rooms. The walk wasn’t long enough, my legs covered the distance too quickly, and so I found myself in front of the door leading to my classroom. With a soft push, I entered the classroom slowly, not listening to everyone repeat the differences between Magyckal and non-Magyckal beings again. For people all bent on equality, they sure spent a lot of time pointing out differences.

I didn’t hear the whispers around me, or see the suspicious looks. I was tired, so tired. It was too much, all the noise and lights, so I lay my head down slowly, not hearing the grand instructor whisper something about “another one,” whatever that meant.





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Atrissa This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Oct. 10, 2010 at 9:02 pm
This is really cool! i love writing about magyck too. could you read and comment on my story Magyck Act or Kadee and Jason? keep writing!
 
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