The End All Argument

By
On the coldest day that winter, the last tear trickled down her face as she kept walking away from the house. Not once did she look back, and not once did he shout her name. Silence.
She was too upset to notice, too upset to see. All she did was walk. Her paces got faster and faster as she hurried to her car crossing the street. The tears fell more rapidly blurring her vision, and she did not look twice before that drunk driver turned the corner. Stillness.
As the wooden door hit the door frame, to his dismay it did not close; instead, the door bounced back open. He let his left ear lead his face to look back at the door, the very place she left not two minutes ago, and he saw it happen. The little black sports car with tinted windows as black as the night sky turned the corner and hit her. The headlights were dim making it hard for the driver to see her and made it equally as hard for her to see him.
Heartbeats stopped, both his and hers. He embraced her for possibly the last time grabbing her hand and intertwining his fingers into hers. His shouts for help were drowned out by his rapid heartbeat, and he pulled her red, bloody body off the ground and into him. Cuts covered her body so that he couldn’t tell where she was bleeding from the most. He just held her close to him, not caring if her blood stained his clothes because the thought losing her forever was far worse than a stained shirt and pair of pants.
The dark red began to fade into the street as it mixed with the rain. It was almost as if the sky was crying blood. In his mind, he felt that the heavens were bleeding enough for the both of them.
Sirens filled the air and drops of rain began to fall. The intensity of the rain increased as fast as his heartbeat had when he saw her lying in the street. Feelings of regret overcame him. Feelings of despair overwhelmed him. And then they took her away from him. She was put on the stretcher and strapped in, but he was not allowed in the ambulance with her.
He just stood there in the middle of the street drenched from the rain and watched as the ambulance sped away from him. Without a second thought, he ran into the house in a panic, and he ripped the sofa cushions off the sofa one by one and flipped tables over in a frantic search for his car keys. He had almost given up when he saw them lying peacefully on his nightstand. The next thing he knew, he was inserting the keys into his ignition and raced off to the hospital.
He was not mentally aware of what was going on, his adrenaline took over. He had no conscious control over where he was going, what he was doing, or how everything happened so fast. Regrets.
The only thing he could think about was how the last thing he said to her was how much he hated her and how he regretted everything they had been through together. The windshield wipers were moving as fast as the thoughts in his head. Disarray.
The automatic doors were delayed in opening once he arrived at the hospital. It was as if fate was trying to keep him from her, but the doors finally swung open. His foots steps got faster and faster until he was sprinting down the halls in search of the trauma wing. Nurses screamed after him while he left a trail of rain water and tears behind him. He was drenched, but he didn’t care. He just wanted to find her.
He approached her room, but he was unexpectedly stopped by an angry doctor. His name was Dr. Patterson.
Dr. Patterson reprimanded, “You aren’t allowed in here unless you are family!”
Puzzled and taken back by the doctor’s statement, he caught his breath and responded, “She’s my fiancée…”
The hospital room was quiet except for the buzzing of machines and beeping on the heart rate monitor. She just lied in the bed still to where she appeared to be dead. The thought of her death saddened him too much, so he ruled out the possibility of her being dead -- just a vegetable. Despite the pain she was in, to him, she seemed peaceful and content.
As he twirled the box with the single diamond, silver band engagement ring between his fingers, he stared at her with a look of worry, a somewhat sad and fearful look, on his face. He watched the lines on the heart rate monitor drop and fall at both rapid and slow paces, and he began to reflect on his life before he met her. He wondered what life would be like without her. It seemed impossible…





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