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Perspective

Two well dressed girls sat facing each other on faded blue Metra seats. Neither one seemed happy. A tension loomed around them as if this were the aftermath of an argument.

“I still can’t believe we have to take the train,” one girl spoke, tugging at the buttons of her cardigan avoiding eye contact with the other girl. Seeing no reaction from her annoyed companion she added, “I feel homeless.”

"I don't think I'm going back to school," the older looking girl spoke directly to the other for the first time on the trip. Her crumpled posture and tousled locks gave her a youthful appearance, but with a closer look her eyes gave away her true age.

“Wait, what? Where did that come from?" the other responded irritably, glancing up from her phone.

"I mean, I've been thinking about it for a while now I guess."

"A while? Steph, you already took a semester off and Dad was pissed. What do you think he's gonna say when he hears you not going back at all?"

"Ok, but I was never actually gonna go back. I just told him that to give myself time to figure everything out.”

"Time to figure out what? Your great escape?"

"If I had my way, yes," Stephanie gritted her teeth as her little sister laughed condescendingly, "J****, Lindi, stop laughing for once in your life. You know I hate it here."

“You're so dramatic. Just cuz Dad wants you to be a lawyer instead of like some, I don't know, underwater basket weaver or whatever he calls liberal arts degrees these days."

"And you're so perfect, going off to become a dermatologist or some other blow off medical person."

"Medical person? You mean doctor? Yeah, that's totally a blow off profession. That's exactly what they say in the first year of medical school—"

"No, you know what, no. I'm not having this conversation with you. You'll figure it out when you realize how much Dad's…persuasion," Stephanie stared out the fogged window, apparently unable to find the proper words, "I don't know. If you really want to be a doctor, then great, but like, I always wanted to direct, but after all the years of "There's no money in film. Just think of lawyers like the directors of the courtroom…" it like it messes with your mind. And finally, you realize, "Wow, I genuinely hate law school. Not only that, but lawyers are kind of lying a**holes. Of course my dad is one of them.""

"Yeah, ok," Lindi rolled her eyes.

"You know, you pretend to be this perfect little prep with your 4.2 GPA and captain of the lacrosse team and president of like five other clubs, but you have absolutely no idea what goes on in the real world. You have no perspective on anything beyond this sheltered suburban life."

"That's a pretty speech from the Anthropologie wearing twenty-two year old sitting across from me on the Metra because she crashed the Malibu her Dad bought for her," Smirking, Lindi put her headphones back in and turned up the volume on her music.

Stephanie's stoic expression left Lindi annoyed. Feeling guilty at how the conversation ended, yet still frustrated with her sister’s perverse ideals, she added, "Don't act like such a martyr.”

She paused a moment, lowering her voice from its previous sardonic tone, “Plus, like, what's wrong with living comfortably in the suburbs? Has your life of privilege really been so unbearable? Stephy?"

Stephanie’s expression shifted. Her face became difficult to interpret as she shifted her brooding eyes to the floor. Could this be an act of capitulation? Or maybe it wasn’t that simple.

Two well dressed girls sat facing each other on faded blue Metra seats. Neither one seemed happy.



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