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disappointed

By , Summit, NJ
With sore feet, Avani reluctantly shuffled her way up the street. Every step brought her closer to the last place she wanted to be: home. She tried to brainstorm the best way to tell her father, but she knew that no matter what he would always be disappointed.

Avani knew it was terrible that she felt so much self-pity. Obviously, the news could be worse. She didn't even like tennis! Of course, her father didn't know that.

Her tennis bag seemed to get heavier every second and something kept on jabbing her leg, no matter how she carried it. Hot tears filled her eyes as she replayed what had happened in her mind.

The excruciatingly long match ending in a loss. The coach reading the names of the varsity team. Her pitiful attempt at being happy for all her friends. And beginning the walk home to tell her father.

Eventually, Avani reached the door to her home. Taking a deep breath she turned the handle and stepped inside.

"Hello?" She called for her father.

Her father was in his office working, like always. When she walked in, he looked up.

"Avani, I finally had a chance to look at your PSAT scores."

Avani smiled. She knew she did well on the PSATs, much better than most kids in her grade. It was one thing her father could be proud of.

"Not very good, your sister did much better. You are going to have to work a lot harder. Colleges don't just accept anybody."

Avani's face dropped. If it wasn't for her dark brown skin, her face would have been a bright crimson. She fought to keep cool.

Avani wanted to defend herself. She wanted to tell her father how hard she works at things she doesn't enjoy and that she sacrificed her social life to do well in school, to make him proud.

But instead Avani apologized and sulked off to her room, deciding to tell him about tennis later. She dissapointed him enough today.





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