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Diary of Witch Erica Carter

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June 17th, 1775

    Even when I am being cursed and hunted by my old “friends”, I, Erica Carter, want to write something down which I think is the greatest event I have ever seen for hundreds of years.

    You shouldn’t be astonished. No doubt only witches and monsters can live for hundreds of years. With such good writing ability, I am absolutely a witch. In fact, Britain has thousands of witches that can change the trends of the world by simply reciting a spell. But normal people can’t notice and no book write about us. We witches have our own rules. Witches won’t be allowed to leave their names on paper, control humans, and show their magical power to normal people. Even worse, we cannot show our true face to normal people. Whoever breaks these laws will be cursed to lose all her witchcraft. However, being the weakest one among the witches, I broke the rules to help George Washington, a man who had great influence on me to start a great revolution.

    George Washington was my ex-boyfriend. Eager for adventure, he, at his seventeenth birthday, wanted to join the British Navy; but his mother refused to let him. Instead, he accompanied George William Fairfax as a surveyor to the unexplored wilderness of the Virginia frontier. We met at that time and soon fell in love. Like a member of the gentry class, he was suave, polished, and proud of being British. Moreover, once he was determined to do one thing, no one, even a woman with witchery like me, could pull him back. He was so uncompromising, so boring, but I was madly fascinated by this man made up of these unique qualities. He worked hard, saved his money, and bought rich land. Soon we broke up.
    I still remember that day. I incessantly sang an incantation about love: “So transfer my will, my spell has been heard, as I will, so let it be”, hoping he would change his mind. However, he was so firm that my witchcraft didn’t make it through. He went away without turning back. Then I started to monitor his daily life by putting spells on his own things such as his food, clothes and furniture. I peered into my crystal ball every day. As time passed, watching his life became my habit.

    His life was hard. In the fall of 1753, he was sent to deliver a message to the French. He had certainly succeeded. However, on the return trip, he hiked for days through snowy woods, fell off a raft into the ice-choked Allegheny River, nearly drowned, and was forced to spend a freezing night on an island without shelter. Roaming around the boundary of life and death, he didn’t complain about anything. I could feel his depression through my crystal ball.

    And I saw that the British were unscrupulous in their exploitation of people in America. Not only did they snatch cotton and tobacco, but they also levied more and more tax on America. British soldiers even made unbridled attacks on people, especially in Boston. All the people in America were plunged into an abyss of suffering, including George. With the mixture of being ignored and repressed, his belief was that the British Stranglehold would collapsed. He bravely encouraged to the rebels to fight against the rulers of Parliament. This action allowed me to think about my witch “friends”. In my childhood, I admired those strongest witches and hoped to learn and improve my own witchcraft from them. The funny thing about it was that I was always rejected. And because I was the weakest witch, they used their stronger witchcraft to mock at me and jail me for no reason. What’s worse, they forced me to do vile things which they wanted to do but didn’t dare to do. Why? I asked myself that many times. Why are we born unequal? Why didn’t I have my freedom to do what I like? I wanted to revolt, but I flinched from their power.

    Different from me, George Washington wouldn’t hold back. Once he was determined to do something, he would succeed. His outstanding charisma and leadership, as well as I, would support him to succeed.

    On December 16th, 1773, the Boston Tea Party happened to protest the British Parliament's tax on tea. "No taxation without representation." Parliament responded in 1774 with the Coercive Acts, or Intolerable Acts, which, among other provisions, ended local self-government in Massachusetts and shut down Boston's commerce. Colonists up and down the Thirteen Colonies in turn responded to the Coercive Acts with additional acts of protest, and convened the first Continental Congress to petition the British monarch to repeal the acts and coordinate colonial resistance to them. The crisis escalated rapidly. It seemed that most of the people in America were outraged.

    I did foresee that their rage would reach it’s peak, and I wanted to promote its progress. On April 18th, 1775, I learnt that the British commander in Boston Thomas Gage despatched an expedition of around 700 regulars under Colonel Francis Smith to search the town of Concord for hidden supplies and weapons. I then controlled Paul Revere and Joseph Warren to warn the militia in Lexington and Concord to ambush the British. On April 19th, I heard the shot of gunfire, like a sign. I was sure that the sign would spread all over the colonies quickly and the revolution would begin soon. Americans with the spirit of seeking liberty wouldn’t shrink back in fear like me. And they had George who would be the most capable commander.

    Just as I expected, yesterday, Congress commissioned George Washington to take command of the Continental Army besieging the British in Boston. Simultaneously, my magic power vanished. My “friends” had cursed on me for breaking the rules. Without witchcraft, the time frozen in my body started to flow again. I became old in one second.

    Ah. I am writing somewhat unconsciously. I need to go to sleep now. Hope George could receive my best wishes for his success and happiness with Martha Washington.






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