Letters to Christian

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October15th, 1860

Dear my precious brother, Christian,

Being that this is my first time writing to you, I may as well introduce my self. My name is Elizabeth and I am twelve years of age, thirteen this coming July. Both our father and our mother work as two of the leaders of our current home, South Carolina. Personally, I can’t think of any really interesting things that have happened to me during my life here, so I have decided to write about the current position of South Carolina in the dispute between the North and South. Oh, here comes Mother and Father, better go… I’ll write again soon!!

Elizabeth

November 21st, 1860

Dear Christian,

Excuse the long-extended absence of writing. I regret not writing for so long, but so much has been happening. Ever since the first day I told our Mother and Father about writing to you, they have been telling me every thing. From the little good things to the rather large horrible things, our parents have not been holding back! For example, they told me that a new party has formed and for the upcoming election, guess who they elected to represent them? That Abraham man from the election so long ago for the position of the U.S. senate is who! Of course, I was also told that only the North supported this decision, which is good. On the other hand, they also told me that two years ago, Lincoln ‘s speech rattled the South, but since he lost, we put it aside. Now, we start to reconsider it’s meaning for the South. I’ll keep you posted, like you asked… Stay safe.

Until there is any news,

Elizabeth





December 21ts, 1860
Christian,

I don’t have much time right now, but I wanted to let you know that South Carolina seceded from the Union yesterday. Soon, we expect all the other states to follow us. Mother and Father have helped the other leaders of South Carolina write and vote for a declaration of secession. For this declaration, Mother said that it was based on the 1776 Declaration of Independence. She also said that in the declaration of secession, we stated how the South would be excluded from the common territory if Lincoln is elected. Goodness! I must go!

Elizabeth

April 30th, 1861

C,

It is no longer safe to keep using our proper names. I know that you want to come home, but you are a northerner. No matter what you might have heard, I will tell you what really happened.
The commander of Fort Sumter in Charleston, S.C., has become a traitor. When we asked all forts to surrender, the commander of this fort did not. In response, we cut off all supplies to starve the fort into surrender. They held out longer than expected… Soon, Lincoln interfered, and sent food to the fort out of desperation to keep it. While the fort was isolated, we were able to capture the fort on April 12th. For 34 hours we opened fire on the fort, until the U.S. troops surrendered while the fort was on fire.

You have not the slightest idea how much it took to acquire this information because when you stayed in the north while our family left with the south, Mother and Father refused to provide me any more information on the subject! You also lost their trust, and my own. Now that the civil war has begun, consider my self your enemy.

This is my last letter to you,

E




July 30th, 1861


Dear Mr. Christian Scottict,

We are most regretful to inform you that two days ago, July 28th, 1861, your sister, Elizabeth Scottict, was shot and killed during the current war at hand. On behalf of your sister’s will, we ask you to attend her funeral on August 17th, 1861.

This letter is in no way associated with any thing to do with surrender or incapability of the South.

We apologize for the loss of your sister,

The United States Union





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