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Memoirs of Paul Revere

The most significant day of my life began just like any other. I awoke from my bed, and hurried to my place of work. My wife, Rachael, was waiting for me as I was about to scuttle out the door of our quarters.
“Paul,” said my wife with a tone of annoyance in her voice, “Paul Reline!”
“Yes d-dear,” I responded as a hen-pecked husband only can, “whatever can I do for you, D-Darling?” I always talked nervously when my wife was around. I adore her with all my heart and she loves me in return, but Rachael is constantly pushing me to better myself. Sometimes that means complaining about virtually everything.
“How many times do I have to tell you not to leave the door open when you leave for work,” my wife nagged, “and where are those copperplate engravings that Dr. Warren ordered last week? By George, sometimes you can be so incompetent …” My wife’s voice faded away as I contemplated about what I have made out of my existence. At forty years of age, I have done nothing for my country except for being a Sons of Liberty member. I wish I was able to have my time to shine, and then everyone will know my name! After my wife was done with her scolding, I left our house (remembering to shut the door) and started off towards my silversmith business. The streets were paved with sun parched concrete that screamed with the absorbed heat of the sun. My daily walk to my business is always teeming with the jovial sounds of children’s laughter and the comforting presence of bystanders, but the streets today were more barren than the Sahara!
“What an unusual predicament!” I worried to myself; half hoping that someone would appear at the sound of my voice. All of a sudden, as if my wish was granted by God himself, a man in black, riding the most majestic horse my eyes have ever encountered was standing in front of me in a flash. He was silent, but his face spoke a story of its own. The man spoke with a booming voice, like lightning crackling at the contact with metal.
“Revere,” the man said, “you have been sent for by Dr. Joseph Warren to serve your country and save multiple lives other than your own.”
“Who are you?” I asked in wonder.
“I…am a friend.” He responded, “Arrive at the Charles River. There, you will be informed of your role in this battle of ours. Remember, Revere…you are Boston’s only hope.” As swiftly as he appeared to me, the mystery rider was gone. As I was left alone in the street I knew that this was what my life had been missing all those years! My life has finally been given a chance to fulfill itself, and there’s no way I’m letting this opportunity slip away from me! I began to make my way towards the Charles River. As I was approaching the waterway, I noticed a boat with the familiar black coated man that sent me to this location in its midst. When he saw me, the man beckoned me to join him in the boat. I obeyed. As we were being rowed across the river, the man spoke.
“The Sons of Liberty have been informed that British soldiers are coming to take two very important Patriots captive. Revere, your destiny in this war is to ride to Lexington, Massachusetts, to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock that British troops are marching to arrest them. We had one of our own in the bell-tower of Christ Church in Boston give us a signal about the Redcoat’s route to Boston. Two lanterns had been hung briefly in the bell-tower, indicating that troops would row "by sea" across the Charles River to Cambridge, rather than marching "by land" over near Boston Neck where he would’ve displayed only one lantern.”
“The plan sounds good, but if it’s going to work, then I’m going to need a horse.” I declared, “I know a friend in Charlestown who can set me up with one.”
“Excellent.” the mysterious stranger added as we reached shore and I exited the boat. The man then got back into the boat, and faded back into the perpetual fog that surrounded the body of water.
My first step was that I needed to go to my good friend Deacon’s house and borrow his horse. After minutes of searching, I found his house and took off with his horse to the Sons of liberty committee in Charlestown to confirm that the Lobsterbacks were coming by “sea”, and not land (my memory was never fantastic). They said that I was right about the water, so then I started off towards Lexington. As I rode by every house I screamed the message of the British to every house in that city.
“THE BRITISH ARE COMING, THE BRITISH ARE COMING!” I bellowed hoping all could hear. I arrived at the house that Mr. Adams and Mr. Hancock were staying and as I entered the house a man stopped me.
“Sir,” the sentry said, “I am going to have to ask you to not make so much noise.”
"Noise!" I cried, "You'll have noise enough before long. The regulars are coming out! British soldiers are coming for Sam and John! I was sent by Dr. Warren to warn them. This is not a drill, I repeat THIS IS NOT A DRILL!” After delivering my message, I left the house and was joined by two others who were sent for the same mission as my own. As we all headed for Concord, we were stopped by a British officer. Fortunately, one of my accomplices was able to escape, but I was taken to a prison and held for a very long time. As I sat in that cell, I knew that no matter what happened to me that it wouldn’t matter because I helped my country. My life…was complete.





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meowers5 said...
Dec. 23, 2011 at 10:08 pm
OMG! Denden, I remember sitting next to u as u wrote this!! We were laughing about the wife being strict!!! HHAHAHAHA -em
 
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