A snowy surprise

By , Harahan, LA

          I stepped one foot outside of the door and immediately plummeted down into the white, fluffy snow. I was knee deep in snow and unsure of how to propel myself up. I repeatedly tried to release myself from the snow’s firm grasp, but every time I pushed upwards, my body sunk deeper. I took a deep breath and then exhaled when I did this a white, misty air exited my mouth. I was perplexed by my surroundings, and I was afraid that I would be stuck in the deep and unforgiving snow forever. My fingers started to tingle, and my nose turned red. I did not think I would ever be able to escape the snow. Suddenly, I felt two hands on my shoulders lifting me up and saving me from my snowy demise. I quickly turned around and noticed that my savior was none other than my fearless and loving father. He was not much taller than me, with brown hair, and tan skin. I looked up at him, showed him my teeth, and wrapped my arms around him, squeezing him tight. We then continued down the trail, taking in all of the beautiful sights and sounds. There were massive mountains surrounding us on either side. Each mountain piled high with thick, bushy trees and enough snow to last a lifetime. I was astounded by the size of the colossal mountains towering over us, I had never seen something so breathtakingly beautiful in my life. On our way, we saw snowy, white owls sitting on trees and tiny, brown rabbits hopping through the snow. We continued on our journey and went to pick up our equipment. When I stepped into the room, I was immediately hit with warmth. I felt like a popsicle on a warm, summer day. I ripped off my jacket and sat next to a fan, hoping to cool off in what felt like the Sahara desert. A short, blonde haired women helped me find boots that fit my microscopic feet, and skis that were the perfect length to slide down the snow. Once I had all of my equipment, I zipped my coat up and headed back out into the freezing outdoors.

          My heels wearily clicked into my skis, my hands tightly gripped my poles and I was leaned on my dad for support. I slowly shimmied over to the smallest and least intimidating hill I could find and started my adventure. I held onto a cold, silver, metal pole, which slowly pulled me to the top of the hill. As I looked down from the top of the hill, I began to breathe fast and heavy, and I searched for a different and less intimidating way to get back to the ground. Panicked, I frantically looked around and saw several small children racing down the puny hill, grinning from ear to ear. These children gave me hope and reassurance that I could ski down this mountain and face my fears. I took a big, deep breath and pushed off of my poles, keeping my skis in a triangle in order to slow myself as much as possible. Going down the mountain I felt like I was going one hundred miles per hour, the wind rushed into my face, my hair gracefully flew behind me, and my fears disappeared. When I reached the bottom of the mountain, I was relieved and a little embarrassed that I was once afraid of such a minute hill. Then, I ran to get back in line, and I repeated the process multiple times until I felt ready and prepared to move onto a real mountain.
          I slowly slid myself toward the large, metal ski lift so that I could get to the bigger slopes. I sat down, tilted the tips of my skis upward, and looked down at the mountains. I saw the tops of snowy trees, footprints of animals who galloped through the snow, and hundreds of happy people skiing down the large slope. When the chair came to a halt, I placed my skis on the snowy hill and slid forward into a mass of people. I crept up to the edge of the mountain and when I looked down, I was petrified by the size and steepness of the mountain. The mountain was intimidating, but I knew that I could ski down it. I took a deep breath and pushed off of my poles. I zig-zagged down the twisting mountain and turned my skis in and out to adjust my speed. I felt invincible and brave while skiing down this monstrous mountain, and the rush of adrenaline was indescribable. When I reached the bottom of the mountain, I felt fearless and proud that I had the courage to face my fears and ski down the mountain. Skiing gave me the confidence to do things that I am afraid of and helped me realize that anything is possible.






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