Visions of Truth This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.


   "Isn't it simplygorgeous?" Her dramatic squeal easily carried over the murmur of the otherstudents. Tossing her short blond hair, she brushed imaginary lint from her bluesilk sleeves. Across the room, a quiet boy watched curiously. "It's designer- very expensive." She bubbled to the mass around her. "Of course,money is no object in my house," she tacked on importantly.

The boyraised an eyebrow at that remark. His vision was suddenly blurry, and from wherehe sat, he couldn't see the blouse, only the food stamps. Plain as day, he couldsee the tattered, treasured food stamps she had begged, demanded and finallystolen from her mother. Blinking, he looked again, and now all he saw were thecrisp, green dollar bills she had traded for the stamps, almost a month's worthof meat for the money.

"And you know, we're thinking of addinganother room to our house." She blathered, tilting her chin slightly. Theteenage audience nodded and murmured approval. He could see her house now,hovering before him like a mirage. It was hardly bigger than a garage. He couldsee the girl arguing as her mother shuffled down the narrow hallway, a toddler ather skirt and an infant in her arms. As their faces became angry, he could readthe woman's lips as she cursed her husband, her children and her life. It wasmore than he could bear. Rubbing his eyes furiously, the boy attempted to removethe haunting vision.

"Something wrong?" The voice of a small,red-headed girl with thick glasses across the aisle made him look up. For aflashing moment his vision blurred, and he could see her playing chess with herfather in their modest suburban home.

"N-nothing." Hestammered, averting his eyes to the floor. '"I just ... my eyes..."

"Yeah, I understand." She broke in, noddingvigorously. "I have vision problems too."

She pushed herglasses farther up her nose thoughtfully. "Sometimes I can't even see thingsright in front of me."

He nodded, glancing at the smiling blonde onelast time. Her flashing smile gave way to a tearful frown and for a moment it wasas though she were really crying.

"Yeah," he agreed softly. Theboy rubbed his eyes, and she returned to a smiling teen. "I can't see themat all."




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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opalescent.stars said...
Dec. 22, 2009 at 6:29 pm
I really like the idea if this. Though, there are a few words in the story that need spaces between them. Great concept though!
 
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