My Tomorrow, a Work in Progress

During my junior year I was presented with the imminent challenge of choosing a
school that would best help prepare me to achieve my goal of becoming a psychologist.
As I pressed on, I discovered psychology was a major course of study in numerous
colleges and universities. The choice of so many schools complicated my making a quick
and effortless decision. As I thought about my major, I took a stroll down memory lane
revisiting specific moments of my past.
I was recently asked, 'Why did you decide to become a psychologist?' This
question carried me back to my childhood and the admiration I held for my pediatrician.
Dr. Joan Budd has been my pediatrician since I was six months old. She always made my
visits as simple as visiting a friend. She had the unique ability to make me feel at ease;
and when I am at ease, conversation flows. It has been important for me to give Dr. Budd
all the pluses and minuses concerning my health, and how I'm doing in general. When
we talk there is always a feeling that she and I have a lot in common. I didn't know what
it was then, but as the years flipped one after the other, I began to pinpoint our
commonalities. She and I share a common love for children and the desire to help others.
Although, through the years I've always said that I was going to be a pediatrician, I have
recently changed only the type of doctor I wanted to become. However, the way I feel
about children and a desire to help others remain the same.
I can recall now always being the borrowed ear; in other words, I am the go-toperson
my friends and others pursue for advice. This position baffled me, yet I never took
it lightly. I am an excellent listener with sound advice. According to them, they are left
with a sense of satisfaction. I would listen to what they had to say, whether it was just a
word or their life story. Importantly, I would never judge, but I would offer practical
solutions and alternative ways of looking at each problem. I gave them an opportunity to
think verbally through their conflicts and arrive at their own conclusions.
Recently when a friend approached me during a lunch break, she was obviously
hurt. Her face was flushed. She made a strong attempt not to speak at first fearing that she
would break down and cry publicly. So we found a quiet away place, and I listened to her
words without offering advice. She began to explain the situation she was having with
her boyfriend, and how he betrayed her trust. She debated the idea of confronting him
and running the risk of ending their relationship. So as I sat there listening to her story, I
was also silently trying to piece together my experiences and other similar situations to
see if I could offer some sound advice. When she finished, I began to explain that I too
was in a similar situation with my boyfriend, and he too had disrespected our set
boundaries by beginning to see other girls. I mentioned how I wasted no time and simply
confronted him. To me, communication and mutual respect are the main factors in all
relationships, along with honesty and trust. My friend and I tossed around several
scenarios, or different ways she could approach the situation, but in the end, I stressed
that calmness and civil conversation was the best way to go. Lastly, I assured her that I
would pray for the best and that whatever she decided and however the situation turned
out, I would always be available if she needed to talk.
As a result of this conversation, I realized a unique personal talent. I have the
ability to listen and offer advice without criticism. I believe that such a gift will be a
useful part of my professional career in psychology.
Presently I am satisfied with my overall accomplishments. Through guided study,
I hope to become Dr. Pauline Ferguson one day.
I would like to take this time to thank you in advance for considering me as a
prospective candidate for your prestigious institution and assisting me in making my
candidacy happen.





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