Magazine, website & books written by teens since 1989

I Turned 30 on My 13th Birthday

By
I like to say that I turned 30 on my 13th birthday. I finished reading Anna Karenina. I took my first college tour and started my scholarship search. I memorized the Driver’s Permit Handbook and was ready to test. By the time freshmen year rolled around, my college plans were set in stone, and I was preparing for the real world. While most of my peers were anticipating their first year in high school, I already saw myself well on my way to college. That was the year that I turned 13...and changed direction. I chose to be a step ahead in life because I chose to follow the great examples my sister’s set.
Growing up as the youngest of three daughters was no easy task. My sisters were eight and seven years older than me. As teenagers, they wanted nothing to do with an annoying, 10-year-old brat. I, on the other hand, followed them around like a stalker. I admired them and wanted to be just like them. When my oldest sister filled out her college applications, I did too, only in blue crayon. I secretly pranced around the house in their prom dresses when they were not home. When they graduated, I stomped around to “Pomp and Circumstance” in the bright red, rayon graduation gown. I wore their shoes, tried on their clothes, played with their makeup, and scribbled all over their books. Naturally, they never wanted me around. They complained that I was bothering them and questioned me when they found lipstick on their clothing. They blamed me for “ruining their lives” when I innocently told our parents of their phone conversations. They teased me for putting milk and cookies out for Santa Clause and for staying up late to catch a glimpse of the tooth fairy. Yet, I had always known that they loved me.
My sisters loved me enough to be the role models that I hope to be to someone else. With their help, I have learned the meaning of hard work and dedication. When I would steer off the right path, they would help me to change direction. They have supported me in whatever I chose to do. Their influence has given me a sense of confidence and determination. I have come to accept myself as the person I am. They helped me to work on my weaknesses and celebrate my strengths. As we got older, we all grew in different ways. My sisters and I became different people, with different goals in life. They hate the type of music that I listen to and we always argue about pizza toppings. In admiring them for the past 18 years, I feel as if I have found a new direction. I held my sister's hand as she nervously waited to get married last year. I comforted her when she opened college admissions letters. They did not just give me good advice, they gave me the world. By showing me the opportunities that I had in life, they helped me find myself. They encouraged me to push the boundaries and reach higher. I came to realize right and wrong at a very early age. If it had not been for their guidance, I would never have never accomplished all that I have. All else aside, they have shaped me into the person that I am today. After all, they were the first ones who taught me the most important things I need to know. They let me know that black is slimming and that purple and orange never match. Most importantly, they were kind enough to inform me that it is never too early to plan ahead. They told me to “Dream...as big as you can” and to “Reach...as high as you can.” I am excited to start college next year, even if I am looking at graduate schools already. I did turn 30 on my 13th birthday, but I would not have had it any other way. I will turn 19 in June, and might I say that at 19 going on 90, the retirement plans look pretty good.





Join the Discussion

This article has 1 comment. Post your own now!

silence-is-loud said...
Mar. 8, 2011 at 7:06 pm
Really nice, inspiring story. I will take an account of this story, for I am the oldest sister of three. I didn't know that simple things could have such an impact on people's lives.
 
bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback