Becoming a Lawyer

Justice is something that needs fighting for. Without it, this world would be a mess. There would be serious trouble in distinguishing the bad from the good, and the fair with the unfair. Laws are in charge of making sure that justice is practiced in certain situations. The absence of a legal system would permit terrible injustices upon the most vulnerable members of society. Having this in mind, we can see why anyone with a sense of justice would want to be a lawyer. Lawyers have the responsibility of protecting the innocent, ensuring that people get equal chances, and defending rights.

Schooling is very important to get into law school. The first step is studying hard in high school, getting good grades, and getting a good score on the College Board /SAT. This is helpful in terms of getting into a good college. Most law schools require having a bachelor’s degree prior to enrollment, so choosing what to study for that is the second step. These undergraduate studies don’t have certain specifications, so what a person studies for their bachelor’s degree does not affect his/her submission to law school. A person can choose to either study subjects that are considered to be traditional preparation for law school (such as history, English, philosophy, political science, economics or business), or areas as diverse as art, music, science and mathematics, computer science, engineering, nursing or education. After choosing what to study before law school, it is important to maintain a good point average. A person’s performance during those years (like maintaining good grades and good point average) is key into entering law school.


Entering law school per se requires a couple of things. It is important to look into the deadlines for law school applications. The sooner a person applies, better are the chances of getting in (applications are abundant, especially around the deadline date). Another step is registering with the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) and for the LSAT online or by mail. The LSAT is offered four times a year in every state, usually at major universities. One can apply to take the test through the LSAC, and the LSAC submits your scores to the law schools you apply to. The last step would be selecting a law school. When making the selection, one should look for American Bar Association (ABA) accredited schools. The rest depends on a person’s own likes and needs (some may like large schools, others small schools, etc). Law schools tend to be competitive, so researching and comparing beforehand is not a bad idea.
Some may consider funding a problem. It is clear that law schools are expensive, since tuition can range from $5,000 a year to more than $35,000. Something else to have in mind is the overall cost when including books, lodging, food, transportation, and other living expenses. Yet, what makes studying affordable are the various economical help options available when entering law school. For instance, one can apply for grants (money given by the Federal or State government). Grants are usually rare and require a long application process, but they are not impossible to get. Another option you can apply for are scholarships, and these are usually awarded for academic excellence. Lastly, one can apply for loans. There are two types of loans: federal loans and private loans. Federal loans are based more on the student’s needs and are harder to get, and private loans usually require good credit.
Becoming a lawyer is no easy task. It takes time, effort and perseverance to succeed. If a person has a passion for justice, fairness and the law, no matter the circumstances that person will endure until the end. Apart from the money earned as a lawyer, the true joy and satisfaction is knowing that you helped the world become a better place: a world with justice, equal rights, and fairness.





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fairy said...
Jan. 30 at 6:47 am
its really inspiring
 
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