Lessons Through a Broken Bone

September 8, 2009
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When I was four years old I broke my elbow. After numerous weeks with a cast on I returned to the hospital to finally have it removed. My mother found it odd that I was so enthusiastic about returning to the place in which I had experienced so much pain. Yet she soon discovered my fascination with the healing process and how doctors help to enhance it.

I was in awe as the doctor removed my cast and asked me to move my arm. Yet I immediately became confused and scared as the pain came shooting back through my elbow. After another series of X-Rays and examinations I was put into a new cast and my mother was told to bring me back in another several weeks. I had begun to doubt the reliability of doctors and my mother expected that I would be reluctant to return to the hospital.

When the day came that I would have my cast removed for the second time I was nervous. The hospital seemed like a more frightening place than it had ever been. Yet I was optimistic enough to trust the doctor as he once again removed my cast and asked me to move my arm. After a brief moment of hesitation I extended and contracted my arm and was shocked by the result. My arm was fixed! Nothing hurt!

As my mom and I made our way out of the busy hospital I released her hand and sprinted away. My mom was instantly fearful that I would find my way into the arms of someone dangerous for at the age of four I was already known for conversing with strangers that I felt were potential friends. As she frantically moved through masses of people in the crowded hospital she caught sight of me. I was crouched down with my head turned up to the face of an old man. Just as my mother reached for me I said, “Don’t worry man, the doctor will fix your legs. You’ll walk again! Look how he fixed my arm!” I proceeded to show him all the directions I could move my newly healed elbow. My mother instantly felt embarrassed and began to apologize to the man and the elderly woman pushing him in the wheelchair. Yet she stopped when she saw their smiles as I patted him on his knee. She had realized that optimism, enthusiasm, and trust were nothing to be sorry for.

Since then I have continued to be fascinated with the human body and medicine. I also still love to help people and will never miss an opportunity to encourage or console someone. But most of all, I still believe that optimism and trust are the building blocks for happiness and success in life. Many things can change in thirteen years, but I am proud to say that these parts of me have always stayed the same.





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josejuanpablo said...
Aug. 25, 2010 at 1:46 pm

MAN UP

BROKEN LEG IS WHERE ITS AT!!!!!

 
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