Good Nature by Turnover This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

November 1, 2017

At some point in every boy’s life, he trades in his teen angst for happiness and adulthood, similar to the musical evolution of the band Turnover, who just released their new album “Good Nature”.  With song title changes as drastic as going from “Cutting my Fingers Off”, from Peripheral Vision, to “Butterfly Dream”, Good Nature, there is no doubt that front man Austin Getz has had a change of heart. Whether it’s the recent move from Virginia to California Wine country, or the transition into a vegan lifestyle, Getz has set Turnover up for success with this new album.


This soft pop, indie record differs from the self-loathing, but harmonious past pop-punk work from two years ago. Lyrics stating, “Take what you’ve got, give it away, nothing belonged to you in the first place. If they’re all us and we’re all them, then it’s like trading between your own hands”(All That it Ever Was, Good Nature), allude to the egg theory by Andy Weir. Weir’s hypothesis creates an idea that we’re all one soul in many different creatures, which would make sense for such a “natural” album. He also mentions in later lyrics that he has been focusing on mindful breathing and thinking, which is a common form of mediation used for tapping into that community style of consciousness. Reflecting on that mindset created the mellow rhythms that develop a feel good atmosphere, and the driving drums that push forward the song like pushing pedals on a summer bike ride in South California, or Getz’s walk into adulthood.


Alternatively, Peripheral Vision represented the awkward teenage phase of the bands life, complete with drug use and depression. The overall album concept is struggling with mental illness and how those around you can help it, or ultimately make it worse. He begins the album by singing, “Without you I’d rather cut my fingers off”, implying that, whoever this person is, he loves him/her very much. However, in the last song of the album the lyrics are, “Forget the nights that we spent laughing til the morning on your bedroom floor...I would hate you if I could”. His opinion of this person has been altered so drastically that he gave up on the love because it was what he needed. The simple, yet overpowering guitar creates another voice in the listener’s ear which begins the album angry, and ends sounding soft and lost.


In Good Nature, Getz utilizes half steps in notes to create intriguing melodies that will leave you desiring a lyric sheet to sing along. Long time fan Tom Walsh described the album by saying, “In contrast to their last studio album, Peripheral Vision, Turnover has turned a new leaf and has tried a brighter approach to the content of Good Nature. With the presence of both of these albums it is clear to notice the change in growth amongst the band members and their personal conflicts.” All supporters of the band have found this exciting light in the group’s new sound, and are looking forward to what’s to come of it.


In hind’s sight, Turnover has had a long time coming of age that ultimately led to their new sunny disposition, which is a transition many can relate to. If you’re someone looking for a nice “Breeze” (4th to last song on the album) on a hot day, lead guitarist’s melodious measures will implant themselves in your brain, brightening your smile all day long.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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