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Nine Inch Nails This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   Trent Reznor took his audience on a journey through his mind which is decaying with the afflictions of society. He spoke to the Boston Garden with grinding guitars, out of control synthesizers and pulsating drums about the downfalls of religion, life and love. He insisted in the opening song that he was "Mr. Self-Destruct."

Trent had the crowd dancing through the next few songs as he jumped around on stage, beat on keyboards, and curled up into a fetal position as he sang in a voice wrapped in anger, sadness and sexual overtones. After the line, "Doesn't it make you feel better," in "March of the Pigs" Trent very angrily told the crowd, "Those chairs don't make me feel better. I'm sorry you guys can't move around and dance." He was referring to the rows of folding chairs that were set up in front of the stage, restricting everyone from moving too much.

A screen was then dropped in front of the stage and Trent began "Hurt," a typical Nine Inch Nails "ballad" in which Trent sang in a voice near tears, about losing everything one has ever loved. The screen showed a graphic, crudely made video that showed everything from people to animals dying. Trent was seen faintly in the corner behind the screen. He obviously didn't want his audience to watch him, but to watch his message.

Trent and the rest of the band played through the rest of the night with profound energy, both giving and receiving it from the crowd. It wasn't long before some kids started ripping up the chairs from the floor! The tell-tale beat of the drum machine for the Nine Inch Nails classic "Head Like A Hole" sounded and Trent had the crowd screeching the chorus "Bow Down Before The One You Serve!" and bowing down to him as if he was a god, which is something. Trent thanked his fans with a stage dive into the audience which drove everyone insane!

Trent's guitar semi-solo at the end of "i do not want this," fell ever so dramatically into "Something I Can Never Have." Trent for the last time that evening would sing to all of Boston about what the world deprived him of emotionally. A blanket of silence fell over the entire arena and Trent ended his ceremony.

Trent proved that evening he is not the self-absorbed, wallowing in his own self-pity type of person he portrays himself to be in his music. He is a man who truly cares about his fans and having them enjoy the show to the fullest. Don't miss them in January at the Worcester Centrum! .




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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