Elton John & Billy Joel This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   Amazing but not surprising, 50,000 fans on a Sunday night and 50,000 fans on Monday night crammed into Foxboro Stadium to show their appreciation to piano prodigies Elton John and Billy Joel; this wasn't just a concert, it was an experience.

For four hours, the fans were up and singing as Joel and John performed "Your Song," "Honesty," and "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me." Billy's band left, leaving Elton to entertain with such hits as "Philadelphia Freedom," "Rocket Man," "The One," and more. Once more, the two joined to sing "I Guess That's Why They Call It the Blues." Then Billy serenaded thousands with "Scenes From an Italian Restaurant," "River of Dreams," "Only the Good Die Young."

The crowd spread into the aisles, on top of seats and bleachers, and screamed, sang, clapped, arranged a wave, and had a once-in-a-lifetime musical experience. It's no surprise that the two could put on such an enjoyable show and leave with every single face, in what seemed to be an endless crowd, smiling and singing while walking to the parking lots, cooking on hibachis, saluting their favorite singers. An intense concert where almost everyone was closely familiar with the songs, it was hours of talent, brilliance, entertainment, perhaps the best concert to hit this country in decades.

Why didn't these two superstars tour earlier? Well, better late than never - and in this case, it really was better. Elton's conservative attitude roused many standing ovations and while his fingers skimmed over the keys, he smiled at the crowd, his eyes dancing, his boyish facial expressions classic to his personality. Though, to many people's disappointment, there were no costumes, only sparkles and leopard-print pants.

Billy, on the other hand, as some bluntly put it, was "crazy, out of control," like many of those who watched in the bleachers. He excitedly sprayed himself with bug spray, explaining "These suckers can fly right into your mouth." He banged on the piano at times, while at others, he, too, sat and belted out his favorite tunes, then bowed in front of the audience. In "River of Dreams," he did half a cartwheel off the top of the piano, waltzed around the stage with what appeared to be a big tube on his head, and jumped into the first row of people. Elton would do no such thing, but he definitely oohed and aahed the audience as well. Two so diverse artists, but two so very talented.

All in all, this was a concert that will linger in the memory of anyone who attended. Adjectives can't describe the entertainment, excitement and energy these two performers delivered to such a huge number of people. Their voices merged as if they had been singing together for decades, and after they left the stage and hopped into limousines that whisked them off, there was a sense of sadness that lingered ... it was over! No one thought it would actually end, even as 50,000 people joined in on "Piano Man" as Billy and Elton merely listened and then began to play again. Yes, it was over, but it will remain as an experience to rave about and never to forget. .




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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