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All-Around Success "RV"

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All-Around Success
“Mom, some idiot just parked this ugly RV outside our house. Oh, my God, it’s your husband.” Thus begins the spectacular film of 2006 entitled RV with a quotation from fellow actress Joanna ‘JoJo’ Jones. It became clear, by that humorous line, that the direction of comedy within their one hour thirty minute time was achieved more than a single occurrence. RV didn’t achieve absolute financial success on Box Office surplus (the amount of money brought in off of ticket sales), but on key movie logistics such as acting and a written plot to work off of. When I saw an explosive exposition/setting, expert actor or actress performances, and the full audience connection was applied to the creation making my critique so much easier to give.

I begin noticing an overworked protagonist along with his typical American family. Bob Marino’s (his name) employer obstructs his family’s yearly vacation (Hawaii) by forcing Bob to a business trip to urban Colorado. The terrible consequence for saying no would be being fired, therefore losing the main source of family income. Mr. Marino formulates a solid, yet, desperate plan to avoid consequences all together. He drags his reluctant family on the RV road trip with the promise that they will bond during their quality time together. Right from the get-go, it’s obvious it’s going to be a bumpy ride. The exposition here described is breathtaking enough to pull me like the composition of a magnet. Having exceptional exposition/setting could easily be compared with a doctor’s mental preparation to undergo surgery on someone; it needs to be present always. Is any person variable needed? Yes, diving into metaphorical surgery without all the important tools such as a film’s actors or actresses would throw off the process.

Three actors in RV showed what they were truly made of simply by the final product. Robin Williams logistically has been acting for years, yet acts in any movie like it is the very first one. I swear the wise man has those strong areas involving reaction, tone, and posture calibrated brainlessly 24/7. Bob Marino, a middle aged man prisoner to anyone’s command, was about as difficult portraying for old Robin Williams. Did he accomplish the task at hand? Well, when a conservative dollar salary comes to you per movie, that task is a little too simple. Williams maintained that masterful charisma through every camera shot. Josh Hutcherson severely contrasts from his famous poignant role of Peeta (The Hunger Games) in RV as muscle man punk at first. Of course, he is going to change drastically at the movie’s end, but that was a fair challenge in the beginning. Both Williams and Hutcherson went on to crazed modern films after airing proving how the smashing film (RV) got them noticed. Giving an average performance beside these two was young Joanna ‘JoJo’ Levesque. ‘JoJo’ was casted as Hutcherson’s sister and I felt a clear lack of emotional connection in her tired acting style. Most people say like father like son; I agree totally here. Levesque didn’t completely detract in the movie; it just left a clear observation for me.

RV made a connection to my own life as a civil RV camper. I noted the dos and the don’ts for camping while laughing myself silly. Humor was up to par with my standards; there wasn’t a dry written or acted out scene. For example, Robin and Josh go to the dump station to empty the waste tank having a bit of trouble since it’s their first time. A bunch of these camping hicks show up in line too, offer to help out Robin, and make the event into an actual party. The intelligence lack within these men as the poor protagonist ends the scene covered in stinky waste after following advice from southern folk. This prime example of humor could be found in just about every seen. Watching this ingenious movie once wasn’t even an option. I couldn’t count all the times I did if I wanted to. The attachment to the viewer especially me is the most important area of concern or no money is made. A switch in belief would change the following movie review on RV. I do have to express an internal truth though and it may be surprising. As well put together as RV was, it is not my favorite movie of all time. I always love a fantastic horror film that stick to me at late hours, but I still regard highly on the following film without a doubt. It just isn’t like a horror format.
RV didn’t achieve absolute financial success on Box Office surplus (the amount of money brought in off of ticket sales), but on key movie logistics such as acting and a written plot to work off of. When I saw an explosive exposition/setting, expert actor or actress performances, and the full audience connection was applied to the creation making my critique so much easier to give. “Mom, some idiot just parked this ugly RV outside our house. Oh, my God, it’s your husband.” It worked for me the very first time and still does to this day. I have shown this film to many individuals in part because of its low rating of PG. There is an overlapping result to watching a humorous film as such: the viewer always leaves happy once the end credits finish.
*RV was rated PG for crude humor, innuendo, and language.*



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