The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick

June 2, 2011
By
More by this author
Book Review: “The Invention of Hugo Cabret”




The novel, “The Invention of Hugo Cabret”, was an interesting and intriguing one. The author, Brian Selznick, was able to capture a 1930’s France. The references to pop culture in that time were accurate and up to date. Also, the author was able to focus in on the busy life of a French train station in the 1930’s. Also, the reader might learn much about the mechanics of older clocks.


Basically, the story is that of a young orphan named Hugo Cabret and his life in the train station. It also tells about his working one of the most important clock in France (in the 1930’s). The story flows well and there is a strong sense of the characters and the place and even the time. The story showed the worst (and/or best) case scenario for and orphan boy in 1930’s France. The author did very well on following the original plot while moving ahead in the story.


Many teens interested in old movies, mechanics, and even magic should pick up this book. It is certainly a page-turner and it will keep you “on the edge of your seat.” I have not read any other books by this author. I am sure, though, his other books, if he has any others, are just as excellent. In conclusion, this is a good read for all ages and I suggest you pick it up and start reading.





Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback