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My World


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Even the idea of high school elicits emotions of annoyance and frustration for most teens. I’m not completely against the belief that high school has slowly become a legalized form of slavery. In fact, I came up with that witty analogy myself. However, despite my obvious adolescent viewpoint, I can’t help but be thankful for the chance at an education. Many believe that it is my inner nerd or the urge to learn which has motivated me to endure endless mediocre assignments, but my desire for education stems from something much deeper. Experiencing the underprivileged educational system in Africa for six years is essentially what sparked my interest in quality learning and helped me sustain faith in all the assignments I view mediocre.

I’m headed towards a career in journalism, in hopes to expose the truth because I want to use the tools I have and mobilize them into something significant. However, my idea isn’t shared by everyone, causing some of my concerns to arise from the situations I encounter on a daily basis. Although I’m constantly reminded that my generation holds the leaders of tomorrow, today’s youth and present day leaders have provoked uncertainty for the future. I constantly roam the hallways of my high school, attempting to make the best of my free education, only to have my ambition contradicted by classmates who believe otherwise. I feel concerned knowing that students have the tools they need to make a significant change around the world, but are too invested with the preconceived belief that youth should symbolize rebellion. I can comprehend the idea that we are young and should enjoy it, but if we continuously prolong responsibilities to secure our future, it will be too late. I witness students jeopardizing their future each day, disregarding that even people with a commitment to education and hard work have had trouble finding success. Whether it’s skipping class to visit the nearby yet deserted mall, or posting provoking pictures to convince the viewer the red cups at the party no longer just contain just juice; what should be red flags is becoming simply a status update on Facebook. What’s truly bizarre is that I’m looked down upon because I haven’t yielded into society’s expectations, while others are praised for doing so. I’m especially concerned because eventually our generation will face critical conflicts, and I’m wondering if everyone has already conformed into society’s wants. Will there be enough innovative minds to help resolve the issues?

My concerns about the world extend far beyond the walls of my high school, and into the hands of public figures. I’m constantly watching the news, learning more about the national issues that are arising. While listening to these issues, I’m wondering why politicians aren’t advocating legislation for education, to better equip the next generation with tools to solve these issues, instead of pursing their personal vendettas. They’re supposed to set examples for the leaders of tomorrow, but instead are constantly lobbying their party’s wants. However, if there isn’t legislation emphasizing education soon, how will today’s youth be prepared to deal with problems facing our nation in the near future? Politicians don’t realize their narrow interest won’t benefit the troubled students that I walk the hallways with.

I feel that education is the driving force behind my ambition because I acknowledge that it can provide me with what I need to be successful. At home, I’m constantly reminded why I’ve committed so much of myself to education; the answer is within the people I respect. My parents’ humble reaction when receiving compliments on their home, children and lives only reinforces my belief in hard work. They’ve established a life in America, in hopes that I will pave a pathway to success. That’s why I don’t excuse myself from striving for success; I believe I’d disappoint the ones who primarily gave me the chance to succeed.

Even though I’m still on the journey to reach my full potential, my fixed definition of success has hindered me. The world around me has evoked the feeling that without perfection, life won’t be satisfying. I’ve been consumed with this feeling for a majority of my life, to the point where education has been clouded. With a town full of rich successful people and friends who mirror perfection, I often downsize my own accomplishments, forgetting I’m competing only with myself. The pressures of attending the prestigious universities in my state, has caused me to believe that test scores could predetermine future accomplishments. I’ve learned to adjust this thought process by reviewing what I actually want to accomplish on days I feel disappointed from an academic standpoint. Constant reminders of the journalism career I want to pursue are plastered around my room. Though copies of my student paper lie on my bed stand and the New York Times app is on my iPhone, I acknowledge that not acing every assignment won’t compromise my dreams. My hope for all the ambition resonating in my room is that it transcends into something purposeful and that it betters my world.

I feel that the significance of my world resides with both today’s leaders and the uprising generation to make a significant change. Albert Einstein epitomizes the meaning I feel my world has by saying: “The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but of the people who don’t do anything about it.” My personal ambitions of becoming a journalist and exposing truth that many choose to overlook, is the contribution I hope to make for the world. From my daily experiences, I perceive that everyone I encounter has the ability to make a significant change, but applying themselves is the part which will make the difference. Their personal stories and goals are only as good as what they accomplish, and I apply that philosophy to my work ethic. I understand that everyone in my world subconsciously affects each other. If we all strive to better ourselves, we will be helping each other.



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