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A Message For the Owls

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Pasty, sallow complexions. Blank faces, devoid of any emotion. Dull, lifeless eyes. No—I’m not describing bodies at the local morgue, but rather my classmates after staying awake until one, two, and sometimes even three o’clock in the morning. Most adults think this is due to late nights of studying, and occasionally this will be true. However, many students voluntarily stay awake far past decent hours, even though they know they will regret their decision come morning.

Staying up late is a vicious cycle. A student who falls asleep as the moon goes down then finds him or herself unable to rise and shine with the sun in morning. Waking up at the last possible moment, a student will rush out the door with a stomach screaming for breakfast. Fading ten minutes into class, a caffeinated soft drink squeezes the last bit of energy from a student, good for an hour or two. The student then becomes indistinguishable from a dead battery—cold, devoid of juice, and unable to be activated. A four-hour nap upon arriving home recharges the student, as he or she prepares for another night of moon watching. The cycle continues.

Some students insist they don’t need sleep. They say they get more done late, and claim their focus is much better in class when they are tired. However, one look at the substandard grades made by those students reveals how mistaken they are. Others insist they just can’t fall asleep before midnight. Well, if they will stop chugging caffeine twenty-four hours a day, and adjust their bodies to a more a normal bedtime, their sleep problems may soon disappear. For the true insomniacs there are several sleeping medications that will cause a refreshing, drug induced sleep, though I doubt most teenagers need them.

A body and mind can do amazing things, but only if there is consciousness to back up the systems. A flashlight won’t shine with lifeless batteries, and neither can a person, if their body is constantly trying to make up for lost sleep. So please, American teenagers, just go to sleep. It could be a life-altering decision. Good-night!



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The_Book_ThiefThis teenager is a 'regular' and has contributed a lot of work, comments and/or forum posts, and has received many votes and high ratings over a long period of time. said...
Jul. 26 at 1:08 pm:
I think this article is very accurate. I try to get to sleep by eleven, though I go to bed earlier during the schoolyear. It is fun to stay up ridiculously late with friends, but unless that is the case, I like my sleep.
 
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theblazingstar101 said...
Apr. 7, 2010 at 2:37 pm:
I agree mostly with your article, being a bit of a night owl myself (although I normally reserve that for weekends and breaks), but one thing I will comment on is your mention of people who have actual chronic insomnia. While there are medications for that, often they have bad or adverse effects. It's not an exact science with them. Also, many insomniacs don't realize they really are such. Other than that, great article. It's very well-written.
 
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