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Celebrities and Their Influence

Living in a technological era, we have access to the tabloids more than ever before. There are television sets, magazine covers, Internet blogs, and movies screaming to be read and watched, and they are plastered with images of these tacky celebrities. When a life of parties, short-term relationships, drugs, and alcohol are leading celebrities like Britney, Paris, and Lindsay to spiral out of control, you would think that their lifestyle is not ideal. But, fans of these stars disagree. Now, in an age where we have more contact with celebrity gossip than we have ever had, we are faced with a question: what are the effects that superstars have on our youth? Celebrities influence fans to be destructively thin, put harmful substances in their bodies, and many parents are concerned with the overall content these celebrities are putting on television, in movies, and over the Internet. Pop culture idols need to think twice before making a poor decision or practicing awful morals because of their influence on their young fans and other people who may look up to them.

Based on a recent Newsweek poll, 77% of Americans believe that celebrities have too much of an influence on young girls. This effect is especially evident in their appearance and attitudes. One poll participant, a first grade teacher, even noticed her students using derogatory language, singing suggestive song lyrics, and even flirting with each other. With celebrities creating impossible standards of beauty, more and more young adults are feeling 'less confident, more angry, and more dissatisfied' with their looks (National Institute on Media and the Family). Based on a poll, 40% of nine and ten year-olds had tried losing weight and at age thirteen (Body Image and Gender Identity, 2002), 53% of girls were unhappy with their image (National Institute on Media and the Family). Now, this cannot all be blamed on the media, but with celebrities becoming thinner and thinner, much self-confidence is lost and images of television stars or models have been connected to body displeasure (National Institute on Media and the Family). Stars need to be concerned about their image because of the unpleasant fact that it causes young fans to strive to be unhealthily thin. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that eating disorders affect more than five million Americans a year, with disorders usually beginning in the teens or as early as eight. Celebrities should stay at a safe weight to insure their health and the effects their weight has in influencing their younger viewers.

Based on the latest Kaiser Family Foundation survey, two in every three parents feel that their children are being exposed to too much inappropriate content in the media. Where does this concern come from? 34% of parents stated that they believe that television contain the most inappropriate content. With television shows today including sexual content, violence, and adult language, children are exposed to unsuitable matter for their ages. Since many parents work and are not always at home, kids have access to shows, movies, and the internet blogs that can tell them things that should be left for parents to explain. There is no possible way to end this media frenzy, but experts say that 'attentive parents, strong teachers and nice friends are an excellent counterbalance,' (Newsweek, 2007) to pop culture garbage. Stars need to be more aware of their images because some are allowing younger fans content that many parents do not want their child seeing.

Celebrities do not only have a negative impact on the looks and personalities of fans, but also in their health. With superstars like Kate Moss taking insane amounts of drugs, Amy Winehouse checking into rehab again, and movie stars lighting up their cigarettes on screen, there has to be some effect on their admirers. 88% to 92% of the top twenty-five box office hits since 1995 have contained tobacco use. Celebrities have glamorized smoking in the media and are setting an example for supporters everywhere that it is acceptable to smoke. Pop culture icons need to support a drug free program instead of using harmful substances. Programs like Above the Influence, run by the Office of National Drug Protection, use the media for good instead of making drugs and alcohol seems acceptable to use. Stars should make it a goal to refrain from using drugs and drinking excessive amounts of booze because it sends a message to fans that a life of drugs and alcohol is a satisfactory way to live.

Celebrities need to change the way they act and how they are viewed. Their actions have more of an effect on us then many people believe they have. Thin, addicted celebrities are changing the way many young fans think and act. Celebrities need to change these horrible habits now and realize that they need to be more concerned with themselves and with their portrayal in the media.

Works Cited

Bergsma, PhD., Linda. "Can Media Literacy Impact Youth Smoking?." Blowing Smoke. Summer 2001. Center for Media Literacy. 25 Jan. 2009 .

'Body Image and Gender Identity.' "Media Effect on Girls." 6 Sep. 2002. National Institute on Media and the Family. 22 Jan. 2009 .
Deveny K, Kelley R, Reno J, et al. Girls Gone Bad? (cover story). Newsweek [serial online]. February 12, 2007;149(7):40-47. Available from: MasterFILE Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed January 23, 2009.

"Facts About Eating Disorders." Eating Disorder Info. National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Eating Disorders. 22 Jan. 2009 .

"Fast Facts." Teen Health and the Media. Washington State Department of Health. 22 Jan. 2009 .
Rideout, Victoria. "A Kaiser Foundation Survey." Parents, Media, and Public Policy. Fall 2004. The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 23 Jan. 2009 .

Witty, Karl. "The Effects of Drug use by Celebrities upon Young People's Drug Use and Perceptions of Use." Celebrities. National Collaborating Center: Drug Prevention. 25 Jan. 2009 .

Young H. When celebrities go wild, parents cringe. Wisconsin State Journal, The (Madison, WI) [serial online]. August 06, 2007. Available from: Newspaper Source, Ipswich, MA. Accessed January 23, 2009.

Join the Discussion

This article has 51 comments. Post your own now!

OwlGravy said...
Jan. 12, 2012 at 4:22 pm
I totally agree me and my friend had a debate on this in school i wish i had read this article before hand because this brings up many good point i could of included.
nazze g said...
Oct. 5, 2011 at 3:53 am
ya dats kinda true
Linta said...
Jul. 21, 2011 at 10:22 am
I Truly agree to the solution of this article that the superstars should think about their image themselves before exposing inappropriate content.
Mikey123 replied...
Aug. 23, 2011 at 5:56 pm
you think your all that well you are. hahha dude thinks she is not all that and + i do make sense
rationalthinker said...
Jun. 30, 2011 at 6:48 pm
Anyone who thinks Amy Winehouse is a positive role model is a moron. More than anything I'd say she's deglamorizing drugs, as they're definitely hurting her success as an artist.
HorseLover said...
Jun. 9, 2011 at 6:48 am
I totally agree with this article. I like how you put a works cited at the bottom, too. It really added some credientials to your essay. Talking about all the polls also made you sound you really knew what you were talking about.
K.M.S.Shear said...
Jun. 8, 2011 at 6:54 am

i kind of agree


nazze g replied...
Oct. 5, 2011 at 3:52 am
ya dats true you know
Uni_que said...
Apr. 7, 2011 at 6:47 pm

I like your article. You had great examples on how celebrities have a great impact on society these days.

Celebrities always have had a huge impact, with their fashion, careers, and even their personal, or "very" personal lives.

And it is affecting not only teens, but older people as well. I always agree with the fact that people crave for media, people follow their influence. Negativly or positivly. But because people feen*** for the news, there is no way of stopping the media ... (more »)

Raniia said...
Jan. 20, 2011 at 6:28 am
i hate cheryl cole she cant even singg
Bee92 replied...
Apr. 28, 2011 at 8:28 am
And you can't spell :|
coolkid said...
Jan. 17, 2011 at 6:19 pm
hey i love this it rocks it helps with this project im doing lol thx
nikki said...
Jan. 15, 2011 at 1:59 pm
yeah i agree. i also think that teens need to stop looking up to celebrities. it's not like they are their friends. we should be looking up to the people in our own lives who make good choices and encourage us to do good also. we shouldn't pay attention to what celebrities do. that's their life. 
jam_spy replied...
Jan. 27, 2011 at 10:43 am
I agree the youth is being affected with alot of power. This is all to do the cause of the "role models" that are corrupting these innocent minds with such nonsense of becoming skinny and doing drogues. These so called celebrities are just another reason of showing how much the world has changed from before. The new comers in this bussiness are ruining the minds of our children!  
Peace!!! said...
Jan. 8, 2011 at 5:27 pm
Ilove this article very good work. Im wrirting a debate speech and this came in handyyy!!! I like the part about how when you get televised on bad behavior your career goes up!
mariasalami This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Jan. 5, 2011 at 11:01 am

I think it's a bit misguided to say that celebrities need to change their ways for the sake of the children. Even though I agree with this, many of them simply don't care about their influence. 

Parents shouldn't expect celebrities to be good role models for their children. They should be proactive to establish in their kids' minds that this celebrity idolization is ridiculous. Paris Hilton has done nothing for the world. She is an empty personality that should never be admired or... (more »)

EmilyMichelle This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Jan. 6, 2011 at 5:50 pm

This is well written and you made your point well. I especially like the bibliography at the end. (: I only have 2 complaints:

1. Some of the language you use is very informal. (i.e. "taking insane amounts of drugs," "booze," etc.)

2. I realize that this is an opinion piece but I find it impossible to believe that you really think parents are not at any fault in children's overexposure to inappropriate material. It is ultimately the parents that have control over what they allow... (more »)

EmilyMichelle This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Jan. 6, 2011 at 5:51 pm
Sorry this was meant to be a new comment instead of a reply to mariasalmi's.
AaronLawrence said...
Dec. 14, 2010 at 7:18 pm
Oh, heaven forbid anyone should be flirting with each other! 
americasnexttopmodel said...
Dec. 6, 2010 at 5:28 pm
Its funny we seem to follow and lead what all the "cool" people do :) we need to fix this :)
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