Gay Rights Paper

Marriage equality should be legal in all states of the United States of America. Currently, same-gender marriage is denied in 44 states in our country. Same-sex couples in committed relationships who cannot legally marry are denied basic protections and rights that are automatically granted to heterosexual married couples. These rights include: making healthcare decisions, entitlement to family leave and receiving Social Security and health insurance benefits. America was founded on the principle that everyone should be able to enjoy life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. “Everyone” includes homosexuals as well as heterosexuals. Denying the right to marry to an estimated 10% of the adult population is both fundamentally and morally wrong.
Marriage equality is a primary civil rights issue in today’s ever-evolving society. Long ago, this country denied African slaves the right to marry, essentially demonstrating that slaves were less than human. Now, another class of people is being marginalized in a similar manner. Some people argue that homosexuality is a sin, based on biblical interpretations. However, the separation of church and state protects religious institutions from being forced to condone or perform same-sex marriages. Churches do not issue marriage certificates; government offices do. When issuing marriage certificates, the application of religious freedom to the issue of same-gender marriage means that the government must not discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation. All adults (regardless of sexual orientation or gender) should be allowed to enjoy the full benefits of American citizenship without compromising the rights of any other person.
The Declaration of Independence states, “All men are created equal.” The marriage equality issue seems better described by a line from the American classic Animal Farm in which George Orwell wrote, “All animals are created equal. But some are more equal than others.” Same-sex marriage is currently legal in only six states in the U.S. In some cases, gay couples just want their relationship to be recognized in the same manner as straight couples. But the issue goes beyond love; it is a matter of legal protection. The idea that a couple would be denied marriage rights in a country founded to provide freedom from persecution is absolutely absurd.





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annashields said...
Feb. 20, 2012 at 11:45 am
i really like this! good job! i wholeheartedly agree!
 
DivingForRoses said...
Feb. 19, 2012 at 7:29 pm
This essay is great! Well-written, free of grammatic errors, and demonstrates developed thoughts. My only suggestion is to start the essay with an introduction, such as a statistic or scenario, then lead into your position statement. Otherwise, it's great. :) (I also agree with your position and have argued the very same reasons, so it's nice to know someone agrees.)
 
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