Teachers This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   "You get out of it what you put into it." This phrase is constantly repeated in reference to education. This may be so for some students, but, as far as I am concerned, I have very little to do with my education. I feel that the teacher I have for any given subject determines the quality and quantity of learning.

In the first week of school, I am able to determine if my teachers are going to stimulate my interest, or put me to sleep with monotonous lectures, and rote memorization. I, as well as the majority of high school students, find it difficult to learn from a teacher who is uninteresting or uninterested. I have taken the liberty of assuming that a teacher chooses a subject because s/he loves it. In fact, it should be so important that s/he wants to teach it to every new group of students. If passing out detentions and giving tests are the favorite parts of the job, then perhaps this choice of profession was not wise.

How can any teacher expect eager students to get excited about what is taught if the teacher is not excited about the subject. A teacher needs to be passionate about the subject. Some may ask how it is possible to be passionate about a subject such as mathematics. Yet, there are those who feel that nothing is more important than numbers.

An education is the most important gift I will ever receive, and I want the works! If teachers start to put a little more pizazz into teaching, maybe the kids will put a little more pizazz into their learning. n


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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