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An Independent Rebellion

The molded maroon plastic bleachers dig into my butt and I shift my weight yet again. I’m practically on the court, and the two teams dribble by, first one way and then the next. The boys leap up, and dunk yet again, the intensity of the game just keeps climbing. Peter, Noah, and Nora step down the bleachers behind us. They say they will be back. Just before half-time they are, and God, they bring a stench with them. They wear the fact that they have been smoking with pride, but the perfume-like miasma that hangs off their clothes and wafts over us is something I wish they would not share. I cough and bury my nose in my scarf. I knew Peter was stupid (even if he’s street smart and has enough charisma to still be popular), but I didn’t realize this was within his range.

I have absolutely no interest in smoking - weed or cigarettes - and I doubt I ever will. I am a sophmore in high school and I don’t want that addiction. I also don’t want that reputation, and I don’t want to have lung cancer when I’m 50. The stereotypical ‘cool’ high schooler smokes weed in the bathroom. That stereotype has got to change.

I smell the smoke on their breath, their clothes, their very skin has been permeated. I scootch closer to the edge of the bench. Grace and Allie follow me.

“Dang, were they smoking?” Grace queries.

“Yeah. I don’t know what, but you can definitely smell it,” I say.

“They need to wear perfume or something if they’re gonna do that,” Grace says, her own perfume is strong, but does not mask the smoldering smell that is now ambiant in the air.

They just shouldn’t do it at all, I think, but I only say: “Or just not go back in public places when they have been.”

Teenagers like to be rebellious. That’s another stereotype, and while I would agree that it is 75% true, this is not a truth to live by This is the reason that teenagers smoke in the bathroom and text when they drive. We like to be independent. We like to know that we aren’t doing something because our parents suggested it; we are doing it because we can. As teenagers, we need to change that perception. We can strive to be independent in different ways. We can strive to make a difference in our community or our state or our country. We can lead our generation, not as the high school dropouts or drug addicts, but as valedictorians and educators of the year. As people who get things done and advocate for our rights and education. We CAN be independent, but why don’t we, as teenagers, put the energy of rebellion behind something new. Why don’t we aim to make a difference?



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CarlyKatherine said...
today at 7:02 pm:
Wow that is a great perspectice on the rebellious teenager. I love it! I had never thought of it that way. 
 
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