The Great Gatsby by F.Scott-Fitzgerald

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In the book The Great Gatsby everybody has an American dream. Based around the 1920s everyone had their own stereotypes and everyone had their own goals to complete. To me it seems that Tom didn’t have one. He was more of a dream killer. Tom in the book felt like a villain that made sure people didn’t get to make their dream a reality. Tom ruined Gatsby’s dream, forced daisy to love him again, and used Mr. Wilson to get back at Gatsby. By the end of the book, Tom ruined everyone’s dream in a way.


Gatsby lost his dream most severely. Gatsby had his life all together and all he needed was a women but Tom was not going to let it be his own. (Even though he was cheating) Even though Daisy said in the hotel/suite that she was over Tom he forced himself on her and made her feel as if she didn’t have a choice. Gatsby clearly had Daisy in love with him but Tom didn’t want to hear it. “Daisy loved me when she married me and she loves me now. No, said Gatsby, shaking his head. She does, though. The trouble is that sometimes she gets foolish idea in her head and doesn’t know what she’s doing” (F. Scott Fitzgerald 131). Tom just is a brute towards Daisy and doesn’t think Daisy has a mind of her own. He is a stereotypical 1920s husband that cheats, puts people down, and worries about only him and his household even though he interfered with everyone’s life. Tom was clearly interfering with everybody’s life and he hated Gatsby so much he didn’t let him fulfill his dream. Tom aka the dream killer has not only ruined Gatsby’s dream but others.


The second dream that Tom has killed was Daisy’s. Daisy had her mind made up that she was going to be with Gatsby but Tom is to stuck up to see it. Tom just feels that Daisy is stupid and doesn’t have a mind of her own to make her decisions she would have to live with for the rest of her life. “I did love him once but I loved you too. Gatsby eyes opened and closed. You loved me too? He repeated. Even that’s a lie, said Tom savagely. She didn’t know you were alive. Why – there’re things between Daisy and me that you’ll never know, things that neither of us can ever forget” (132). Tom never lets Daisy speak her mind; he puts words in her mouth that she probably doesn’t even believe in. Since Daisy lets Tom treat her like a typical 1920s women, he lets her be dumb and not pursue a good lifestyle. Even though Daisy claimed she loved Gatsby, she was forced by Tom not have a mind or be able to love another man. Daisy was basically Tom’s backup woman.


The final dream that Tom killed was Mr. Wilson’s. Mr. Wilson was as loyal as a dog to Tom but Tom had a secret, he was cheating with Mr. Wilson’s wife. “What if I did tell him? That fellow had it coming to him. He threw dust into your eyes like he did in Daisy’s, but he was a tough one. He ran over Myrtle like you’d run over a dog and never even stopped his car” (178). Tom basically used his fake friendship with Mr. Wilson to get back at Gatsby. He uses the anger and aggression that Wilson had and made Wilson even more determined to get Gatsby. Tom didn’t even care that Mr. Wilson was going crazy but he encouraged him to find his wife’s killer even thought Gatsby didn’t kill his wife. Mr. Wilson was also uncovering that Tom was having an affair with his wife. Right after Tom killed the relationship of Daisy and Gatsby Tom must have thought he should rub it in Gatsby’s face and use Mr. Wilson to finish his dirty work.


In the 1920, the American dream was the main aspect. Tom ruined about all of the characters dream in one way. His victims were Gatsby, Daisy, and Mr. Wilson. Everybody had some goal and to me Tom’s goal was to ruin people’s goals. Gatsby got killed for something Tom’s wife did and Tom feels that he disserved it. Daisy and Tom would always live with a chip on there shoulder because Daisy knows the truth and Tom doesn’t but he sees himself as a hero.





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