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New York and New Jersey

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Since the three years I’ve been living in Snellville, GA, it was a well known stereotype that if you were born and raised in these two states, you had a accent, you separated yourself from others, and for some people it was okay to put others down and to get into fights and get suspended; all because of where you were from.

For example, if a person tried your patience and thought they could get away with it and you happened to be from New York, you would be like ‘Oh, you don’t know me, I’m from New York!’ and to prove your point, you get in a fight with said person and wind up getting arrested and paneled from the school system, thus setting off a horrible chain of events that could ruin your life in the long run; I seen it happen twice.

However, I have to point out that this stereotype shouldn’t apply to any New York native until you get to know them first.
From an outside point of view, that seems like an odd topic to write about, right? I even thought so too. In fact, I never saw this as an important topic until it came to my attention in my Sophomore Honors Language Arts class, when our new principal paid a visit to discuss the resentment made about his announcement over the matter a few days previous.

My Language Arts class is full of intellectual and talkative kids (majority of who are from New York) who would jump at the chance to have a debate about any topic that interests them; unlike me, who is more reserved and likes to keep her comments to herself most of the time. Whenever I would hear a debate like this beginning to brew up in class, I would make myself comfortable and prepare for a nap, or simply pull out a book to read until it’s over.

Not this time. I paid attention from beginning to end. I think it was because I wanted to see how the principal would carry himself in this kind of situation (and I must admit, he handled himself well), and I for once also wanted to hear what the students had to say. I learned something new that day.

No matter where you come from, it’s okay to show pride of where you represent, but it’s not okay to shove your pride down others throats. It’s okay to voice your opinions, but respecting where others come from makes you a much better person.





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