Magazine, website & books written by teens since 1989

Allow Time for Compassion

By
Often times, one doesn’t stop long enough to view the possible consequences of an action. In life, each event has an outcome based on the way one responds to a situation. Unfortunately, people are in such a rush that they fail to see that different reactions can significantly alter the outcome of an event. In a society so consumed by time, people and the environment are forgotten. If society were to slow down, it would be able to see that compassion can be used to see each event differently, consequently creating beneficial outcomes.

In the idealistic world, compassion would be used daily; the homeless would be given aide to find shelter and food, trash-filled streets would be clean, and every person would be treated equally. Unfortunately, this is not the reality. The homeless are disregarded as outcasts of society, living in inhuman conditions. Garbage continues to pile up to the point where it is futile to attempt to clean it. People who are “different” by color, race, sexual orientation, and age are viewed as inferior, and thusly denied opportunities. To the average person where time is precious, these issues are too time-consuming and forgotten. However, those who take the time to stop and use compassion will be able to see that the forgotten can contribute to society if given the chance.

From my personal experiences, I have found that an act of compassion can be extremely rewarding. About a month ago, I went on a vacation to Reno. While we were walking out of a buffet, I noticed a man sitting in a wheelchair. His greasy hair was held back in a disheveled bun, exposing the deep wrinkles cut into his sun-beaten face. His clothing was noticeably too small for his large frame and torn in numerous places. “Just another guy asking for money,” I thought to myself as I continued walking. Just as I finished my thought, somebody tossed a one-dollar bill out the window, about a foot away from the man. Eyes glued, I watched him struggle to reach the money. Almost instinctually, I ran across the street, ignoring the impatient driver’s honks. As I approached the man, I slowed my run into a casual walk, and tried to think of what I could possibly say to this stranger.





Join the Discussion

This article has 1 comment. Post your own now!

fatchance96 said...
Jun. 25, 2011 at 8:40 pm
I totally agree with you! Helping others can really make you good. Compromise is always a better choice than creating a win-lose situation. In other words, if you feel someone is very unfortunate, would it be better to make fun of them so it could make you feel "good" because you are luckier than them? Or is it more satifying to take the time to help 'em out, making YOU feel better than you ever will taunting people, all the while making that person love you forever? Make the decision youself, a... (more »)
 
bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback