Elderly Citizens This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   Elderly Citizens by C. P., Providence, RI

"They're useless." "They don't do anything worthwhile for society." "Why should I pay attention to them?" If asked that question two years ago, I would most likely not have given an intelligent answer. However, I have changed from being an unaware person to someone who is looking out for the less fortunate. I can now answer that question adequately without a second thought.

Walking into Waterview Villa Nursing Home in the summer of 1992 helped change my views on elderly citizens. In the past year and a half, I have without a doubt become a better person. At first, getting to know May (age 88) and Reneir (age 84) appeared to be the most difficult of tasks, but soon I realized there was an easier route to take.

Rather than trying to be someone I wasn't, I simply offered them my love and friendship. Within a month, I had become friends with two of the most influential people in my life. May and Reneir have taught me that life isn't always fair, and that sooner or later, everyone must face old age and all the problems it involves. For instance, they had both been women who were active in society and now they are confined to restricted lifestyles as residents of a nursing home.

I spend an average of two to three hours a week with these two special ladies. We sit around and talk about anything that comes to mind. For example, May likes to talk about her days of working at Crescent Park, and Reneir likes to tell me about how much she enjoyed being a nurse. Whatever we do, I give them all my attention because they are life's treasures filled with love and knowledge which they are always willing to share.


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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