I Am a Mosquito This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

July 20, 2009
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My friends always roll their eyes when I tell them about my latest scheme. If I'm lucky, they'll agree to help, but usually they just give me a look that says, “There she goes again, trying to save the world.” What hurts the most is being told that I can't save the world, that nothing I do will ever make a big enough difference.

So, here's the deal. I realize that I have a very small chance of becoming the next Mother Teresa or Gandhi, but I also realize that every little bit counts and because of that, I am making a difference. I know that my actions, and those of others like me, change the lives of people around the world every day. Just knowing that makes everything worth it.

Truthfully, I can't find reasonable proof for the often-repeated statement that I'm too young and too insignificant to really change the world around me (if you can think of one, let me know). I can't say often enough that every little bit counts. For example, the other day when I was raising money for my school, a girl found a penny in her pocket to give me. Some of the other kids I was fundraising with laughed when she bounced away, proud of herself. It made me sad that they didn't see the significance of what the girl, who couldn't have been more than six, had done. She only had a penny and she donated it. So what if it's only one cent out of the $3,000 we needed? If everyone donated their pocket change, I'm sure we would have reached our goal.

The point I'm trying to make is illustrated perfectly by New Jersey Governor Christie Todd Whitman, who said, “Anyone who thinks that they are too small to make a difference has never tried to fall asleep with a mosquito in the room.” No matter how hard people try to deny it, little things can make the biggest difference.

Lending a helping hand to an elderly neighbor will always make the world a more positive place. Giving up a weekend to plant trees in front of your school will have an effect on your community. Donations to those who stand outside grocery stores are always appreciated. And using a charity search engine (there are many to choose from) has the potential to boost an organization's fundraising one click at a time.

So I pride myself in being a mosquito, even if my buzzing can be annoying at times. Who knows, the kid who receives one of the books I donated the other day may be inspired to write the next great novel. Or perhaps, someone who benefited from the school supplies drive I hosted last year will become a doctor and cure cancer. Or maybe that kid you tutored last week will go to college and become a politician who works for peace. Sure, it may be a long shot, but in the end I think it's worth it.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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Shannon_Bananon said...
Apr. 25, 2010 at 9:35 am
The title fits, and I like how you wove that quote throughout your entire article. Congrats on getting this published, you deserved it.
 
StEaMbOaT said...
Sept. 29, 2009 at 2:18 pm
I like how you try to make a diffrense in the envirment even thow that no one cares
 
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