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Ganymede replied...
Mar. 1, 2006 at 4:47 am

darling, I think this would all be a good deal simpler if you'd give an example of a "complex" phrase which you'd like to have parsed.

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hopelesshubcap replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 6:01 pm

Wow these rules are gonna be a bit hard for me to fallow...but I'll try my best!

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Ganymede replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 6:10 pm

Please don't let them lie fallow; it won't help a bit.

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hopelesshubcap replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:07 pm

I corrected it

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Ganymede replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:10 pm

No, you didn't.

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hopelesshubcap replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:18 pm

Quote:
Originally posted by Ganymede
No, you didn't.

oh?

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Ganymede replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:22 pm

"Follow" isn't spelt with an "A"

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hopelesshubcap replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:26 pm

Quote:
Originally posted by Ganymede
"Follow" isn't spelt with an "A"

Woops, sorry im a horrid speller, well, thank you.

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J'aimeleshommes replied...
Mar. 8, 2006 at 7:59 pm

OH FOK!

I did it again. Ok, I don't understand direct objects. I was just being stupid and blanked out for like three weeks on what I actually wanted to foking know.:mad:

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Ticklipple replied...
Mar. 9, 2006 at 5:35 am

Okay.

In general, the direct object is the noun directly right of the verb. E.g.

'The boy ate the pie.'

Exceptions:

- A sentence doesn't necessarily require a direct object. If the verb is intransitive (doesn't govern an object), there may not be one present in the sentence at all.

E.g.

'The girl ran.'

- Sometimes, a verb (known as di-transitive) governs two objects (the direct object and the indirect object) without any prepositions to distinguish the nouns. In cases like this, it's the second noun that is the direct object.

E.g.

'Sarah gave the monkey a banana.'

If you're unsure still, a good test is to see whether you can insert a preposition like 'to' or 'from' in front of the object - the direct object doesn't take prepositions (though you may have to change the position). Thus,

'Sarah gave a banana to the monkey' or
'To the monkey, Sarah gave a banana' both work, whereas

'Sarah gave the monkey to the banana' gives the sentence a totally different context.

In summary: The direct object is usually directly right of the verb.
If there is a preposition before it, it will be an indirect object, not a direct object. If there are two nouns right of a verb, undivided by a preposition, the right-most object will be the direct object.

Has that cleared things up at all?

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Rae replied...
Mar. 9, 2006 at 8:04 pm

I think everyone should be required to study Latin!

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Ticklipple replied...
Mar. 9, 2006 at 8:05 pm

Latin does actually help SO MUCH.

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J'aimeleshommes replied...
Mar. 10, 2006 at 12:12 am

Quote:
Originally posted by Rae
I think everyone should be required to study Latin!



Meh, didn't want to, I chose French instead.

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Rae replied...
Mar. 10, 2006 at 1:37 pm

If you wanted to take it, it wouldn't have to be required!

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J'aimeleshommes replied...
Mar. 11, 2006 at 10:40 am

Yeah, but I had the option to take it, I just did not want to.

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'Graff replied...
Jun. 16, 2006 at 12:25 am

For a publicly available copy of Strunk & White's "little book," go here:

http://www.orwell.ru/library/others/style/index.htm

or

http://www.bartleby.com/141/ .

Both are legitimate, legal copies. And the book is very well worth the energy spent in reading. Very useful to have on hand--I still suggest purchasing a copy if you can.

--------------
Wellington

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Ganymede replied...
Jun. 16, 2006 at 2:29 am

Oh Tom, this one's darling, do let's keep him!

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Ticklipple replied...
Jun. 16, 2006 at 3:33 am

Yes! I like free things!

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Saratn replied...
Jul. 17, 2006 at 9:23 am

Just want to check up on something real quick.

Can you safely do this like you would with a contraction? It would only be when someone is speaking to I believe.

Example: "'Ere you go."

Can you remove the h in there and use the apostrophe?

And another thing, when having people talk, how do you know when to use a comma at the end of the sentence or to use a period? I get confused with that.

Example: "I don't know what is going on," he said.

or would it be: "I don't know what is going on." he said.

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Ticklipple replied...
Jul. 17, 2006 at 9:30 am

1. Yep, the apostrophe can stand in for missing letters when illustrating dialects, etc, no problem. The same with any other instance - 'Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em', for example.

2. I think this might be slightly more varied in American English (I could be wrong), but certainly in England, you end with a full stop only if nothing is going to come after. So it'd be:

"I don't have a clue," he said.

VS.

He replied, "I don't have a clue."

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